Tag: kids in the kitchen

Tips to Keep Kids Safe and Healthy This Summer

By Shanna Lisberg

Children’s health and wellness has always been a key issue for the Junior League. Programs such as Kids in the Kitchen seek to help reverse childhood obesity and its associated health issues. While living a healthy life involves healthy eating and staying physically fit, a healthy lifestyle should also involve being safe and making healthy lifestyle choices for yourself and your family.

This summer, children will be playing outside and basking in the sunshine, as the warm weather and longer days bring plenty of opportunity to enjoy the outdoors. Help keep your kids safe and healthy this summer with the following tips:

    1. Keep kids hydrated. Remind children to drink often throughout the day, especially if they are playing. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends drinking about every 20 minutes if kids are active in sports. About five ounces is fine for a kid weighing 88 pounds.
    2. Protect children’s skin from the sun. Everyone should apply a water-resistant sunscreen that protects against both UVA and UVB rays every day of the year. Sunscreen should be at least SPF 30 and should be applied 15 to 30 minutes before going outside
    3. Sunglasses are a must. Overexposure to UV rays can be especially harmful for the very young. The lens in a child’s eye cannot filter out as much sun as an adult lens. Some studies suggest that 80 percent of sun damage occurs before age 10.
    4. Inspect playground equipment before letting kids play on it. Before your kids play on the playground, be sure to check it out first. It’s important to make sure that nothing is broken or rusted. Also, keep an eye out for metal equipment and surfaces that can become hot in the sun and can cause burns.
    5. Make sure your children have proper footwear. While flip-flops can keep feet cool, they are not the most appropriate footwear when children are playing. Make sure your children’s feet are covered to protect them from injury.
    6. Follow pool safety. Never leave kids alone near the pool and always swim only in designated swimming areas when a lifeguard is on duty. Teach your children to swim. Air filled or foam toys, such as water wings, noodles, or inner tubes, should never be used in place of life jackets. These toys are not designed to keep swimmers safe.
    7. Bike Safely. Make sure your children know the rules of the road and appropriate hand signals for turning and stopping. Make sure your child always wears a helmet and that it fits properly. Check your child’s bike to make sure the brakes, tires, and reflectors are all working correctly.
    8. Travel with care. Teach your children to buckle up every time they get in the car, no matter how long the drive. If your children are young, make sure they are adequately secured in age- and size-appropriate car seats and booster seats.
    9. Beware of insects. Protect your kinds from insect and mosquito bites by using insect repellent. Choose a repellent with no more than 10% to 30% concentration of DEET. Be watchful when it comes to ticks and check your kids every day.

 

Remember, just because you are being safe, doesn’t mean you can’t have fun this summer!

*Material for this article from How Stuff Works, United Healthcare, the Massachusetts Office of the Child Advocate, and the National Traffic Highway Safety Administration.

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Make Your Favorite Recipes healthier – A Substitutions Guide

For many Junior League members, cooking has been a passion for years and hosting dinner parties has been an easy way to stay in touch with friends and to catch up over good food, wine and conversation.  It’s also a great way to relax at the end of a long day and to try fresh local ingredients.

So many amazing family recipes from our grandmothers and mothers are filled with yummy ingredients like butter, heavy cream, cheese, and did I mention butter? Although these recipes are delicious, when cooking for my friends and family, simple ingredient substitutions can help to make the meals just a little bit healthier without sacrificing the flavor or spirit of the dish.

There are a lot of great websites and resources to help us succeed at making these substitutions. The Mayo Clinic is a favorite resources. They have 5 quick tips on healthy substitutions, and an entire section of their site that focuses on Nutrition and Healthy Eating. Eat Better America is another site that has some great tips and tools and good education on overall health and nutrition.

If you don’t have a lot of time to do research on these sites – here are some key items from the Mayo Clinic that they recommend as substitutions you can make in your meals.

Your guide to ingredient substitutions for healthy recipes
If your recipe calls for this ingredient: Try substituting this ingredient:
Bacon Canadian bacon, turkey bacon, smoked turkey or lean prosciutto (Italian ham)
Bread, white Whole-grain bread
Bread crumbs, dry Rolled oats or crushed bran cereal
Butter, margarine, shortening or oil in baked goods Applesauce or prune puree for half of the called-for butter, shortening or oil; butter spreads or shortenings specially formulated for baking that don’t have trans fats

Note: To avoid dense, soggy or flat baked goods, don’t substitute oil for butter or shortening. Also don’t substitute diet, whipped or tub-style margarine for regular margarine.

Butter, margarine, shortening or oil to prevent sticking Cooking spray or nonstick pans
Cream Fat-free half-and-half, evaporated skim milk
Cream cheese, full fat Fat-free or low-fat cream cheese, Neufchatel, or low-fat cottage cheese pureed until smooth
Eggs Two egg whites or 1/4 cup egg substitute for each whole egg
Flour, all-purpose (plain) Whole-wheat flour for half of the called-for all-purpose flour in baked goods

Note: Whole-wheat pastry flour is less dense and works well in softer products like cakes and muffins.

Fruit canned in heavy syrup Fruit canned in its own juices or in water, or fresh fruit
Ground beef Extra-lean or lean ground beef, chicken or turkey breast (make sure no poultry skin has been added to the product)
Lettuce, iceberg Arugula, chicory, collard greens, dandelion greens, kale, mustard greens, spinach or watercress
Mayonnaise Reduced-calorie mayonnaise-type salad dressing or reduced-calorie, reduced-fat mayonnaise
Meat as the main ingredient Three times as many vegetables as the meat on pizzas or in casseroles, soups and stews
Milk, evaporated Evaporated skim milk
Milk, whole Reduced-fat or fat-free milk
Oil-based marinades Wine, balsamic vinegar, fruit juice or fat-free broth
Pasta, enriched (white) Whole-wheat pasta
Rice, white Brown rice, wild rice, bulgur or pearl barley
Salad dressing Fat-free or reduced-calorie dressing or flavored vinegars
Seasoning salt, such as garlic salt, celery salt or onion salt Herb-only seasonings, such as garlic powder, celery seed or onion flakes, or use finely chopped herbs or garlic, celery or onions
Soups, creamed Fat-free milk-based soups, mashed potato flakes, or pureed carrots, potatoes or tofu for thickening agents
Soups, sauces, dressings, crackers, or canned meat, fish or vegetables Low-sodium or reduced-sodium versions
Sour cream, full fat Fat-free or low-fat sour cream, plain fat-free or low-fat yogurt
Soy sauce Sweet-and-sour sauce, hot mustard sauce or low-sodium soy sauce
Sugar In most baked goods you can reduce the amount of sugar by one-half; intensify sweetness by adding vanilla, nutmeg or cinnamon
Syrup Pureed fruit, such as applesauce, or low-calorie, sugar-free syrup
Table salt Herbs, spices, citrus juices (lemon, lime, orange), rice vinegar, salt-free seasoning mixes or herb blends
Yogurt, fruit-flavored Plain yogurt with fresh fruit slices

 

 

The Kashi/Kids in the Kitchen Success Story: $75,000 to distribute to Leagues for local KITK initiatives!

As many of you know, The Junior Leagues’ Kids in the Kitchen (KITK) initiative to fight childhood obesity and promote good nutrition got its start in 2006 with inspiration from The Junior League of Calgary’s Junior Chefs program. To date, more than 200 Leagues across the Association have implemented programs in partnership with local community organizations, chefs, and nutritionists.

In order to build out the next phase of this successful initiative, AJLI aligned itself with Kashi, the maker of nutritious, all-natural foods, which provided funding for a planning grant and also agreed to make $75,000 available in grants to individual Junior Leagues if the Leagues collectively demonstrated their support for the program through a “Like” button promotion on Facebook.

The exciting news is that we did it! We put our money where our mouths (or our mouses) are. We showed enough love to qualify for the full $75,000 the company allotted to us. This means that AJLI has $75,000 to distribute to Leagues in grants of $2,500 or $5,000 to support their local KITK initiatives. As of our grant application deadline earlier this week, we had received more than 100 applications, which will be vetted by Kashi before Annual Conference where the winning Leagues will be announced. Congratulations on this tremendous effort to mobilize; we have truly demonstrated the power we can bring to bear upon a cause we believe in!

Kashi and the AJLI – Kids in the Kitchen leaguewide fundraiser

Please visit the Kashi Facebook page and click "Like." Every "Like" will raise $10 for Kids in the Kitchen.

Kashi and The Junior League—WE’RE LIVE!!

Please help us earn $75,000 for Junior Leagues’ Kids in the Kitchen programs across the Association!

Throughout the year, The Kashi Real Project™ will feature organizations working to solve the Real Food Deficit, the gap that exists between the company’s vision for a healthy community of the future and the real-world food insecurity of today.

The Junior League will be Kashi’s featured partner from January 31st to February 22, 2012. Kashi will donate $10 every time a statistic related to the Real Food Deficit is shared via their Facebook page until the donation total reaches its maximum of $75,000. So please go to Kashi’s “Real Project” Facebook page, which should look like the picture on the right, and click the purple “Like” button in the purple star. Just one click, and you will earn $10 for Junior League’s Kids in the Kitchen program!

The money we earn will be awarded to individual Leagues who apply for a grant—there are two levels, $2,500 and $5,000—to support their local KITK program. The grants will be distributed to winning applicants at this year’s Annual Conference in San Francisco.

The Application is posted online in the Awards section of the AJLI Member website via Survey Monkey on Wednesday, February 1 and must be completed by Wednesday, February 29. Click HERE to access additional information and the application.

Also, if you run a Kids in the Kitchen program and haven’t updated your event/program on the Kids in the Kitchen website please do so TODAY as people will be directed to the site to learn more about local programming…we want to be sure all information is accurate! Click HERE to access Events listing.

With your individual voice, our collective Junior League voice and Kashi’s dollars, we can better help reduce the real food deficit through our local Junior Leagues’ Kids in the Kitchen programs across the Association.

Six Month Financial Report (7/1/2011 – 12/31/2011)

The financial report for the first six months of AJLI’s current fiscal year (July 2011 – December 2011) enables you to see the financial position of AJLI. You can download the report HERE.

Should you have any questions or wish to follow up on this document, please contact any member of the AJLI Board of Directors.AJLI Finances WebinarJoin Sandra Thomas, AJLI Treasurer, for a review of AJLI’s first-half 2011-12 financial results, covering the period July 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011. The webinar will be held on Monday, February 13, 2012 at 3 p.m. Eastern Time. Click HERE  to register for the webinar.

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