Category: Training

President-Elect Log Q1 (June – August 2016)

President-Elect Log Q1 (June – August 2016)

President-Elect Log Q1 (June – August 2016)

Many of you have seen Candice’s President’s Log in the weekly e-blast about what she’s focused on for that week or something interesting that is happening in the League. I have decided on a more modest goal, a quarterly blog post about the role of President-Elect. I hope this regular post will give you some more insight into the role of President-Elect and answer the question, ‘What exactly does the President-Elect do?’

June: 

Leadership Retreat – Retreat planning begins in the Winter. The content and messages are owned by the President but the President-Elect also attends the planning meetings, collaborates on messages and content, and assists with the operational aspects of the program. This year, after hearing feedback from committees that they wanted more direction from leadership, Candice and I developed annual plans for every committee and included metrics for committees tied to our new Strategic Plan.

CityClub Luncheon – JLS members had a key role in the formation of the Seattle CityClub (link to their website). Every year, we host a table at their fundraising event including JLS Board Members, Managers, staff and key committee leaders.

Annual Campaign Donor Event – For the past several years, we’ve hosted an event for people who donate over $100 to our Annual Campaign. It’s a nice way to say thank you to those members and non-members that have supported us and a great way to connect with Active and Sustainer members.

Sustainer Cocktail Party – Our Sustainer members host an annual cocktail party. I had a great time connecting with Past Presidents and meeting Sustainers. I always learn something new about the League when I attend a Sustainer event.

I also spent time this month meeting with Managers. We were able to get to know each other better and talk about goals for the year.

July :

Management Council – The JLS Management Council is made up of the wing managers, Treasurer-Elect, Sustainer Manager and Management Council Secretary and is responsible for overseeing day to day operations of the League. We spend time reviewing information submitted by Committee chairs/ vice chairs from the Leadership Reporting Form, addressing issues that affect individual committees or the entire League. Management Council meets year round and meetings are open for members to attend through our Pathway to Boards program. You can register to attend through the JLS website.

In July, Managers had a chance to provide feedback on a draft version of the strategic plan.

Provisional Retreat – I attended my first JLS Provisional Retreat and it was awesome! As a transfer, I completed my Provisional year at another League so I loved having an opportunity to see how the JLS welcomes our newest members. I presented a brief history of JLS, got a chance to meet new members and even caught a few Pokémon.

Bellevue Art Museum (BAM) Kids Fair – Completed my first service shift of the year! We’ve partnered with BAM to do our Northwest Art Program for the last several years. They are a great partner and this is a super fun art-tastic event. I enjoyed working with both Active and Provisional members.

I spent some time visiting wing meetings so that I could meet more members and address any questions or concerns that Managers and Chairs may have.

August:

Transfer Social – Did you know that the Membership Committee assigns two Active Advisors to welcome/support members that transfer to our League? Women that transfer to the JLS bring a wealth of experience and great ideas from other Leagues. (I’m not just saying that because I’m a transfer, I swear!)

Board Meeting – The Board of Directors also meets monthly and is focused on the strategic direction of the League. As the President-Elect, I get to attend both the Management Council and Board Meeting. I got to run the August Board meeting as Candice was out of town. Like Management Council meetings, Board meetings are open for members to attend through our Pathway to Boards program. You can register to attend through the website.

Premier Event Meeting – Candice and I meet monthly with Kate Gonsalves (Premier Event Chair), Ali Gilson (Fundraising Events Manager), and Minda Brusse (Director at Large, Raise the Paddle Board Project). The Premier Event is our largest fundraiser and there are some great things already planned for the February 2017 event.

JLS 100th Anniversary Ad Hoc Committee Meeting – There has been an ad hoc committee made up of Actives and Sustainers that has been meeting during the past two years to begin planning for our 100th anniversary. This ad hoc committee is scheduled to become a regular committee in 2017-2018 (my presidential year).

WHEW!!That was a lot more than I thought I had to talk about. Maybe this should be a monthly post…I’ll think about it.

Before, I close I just want to point out a couple of things that are not in this post. I have not included details about answering JLS emails and phone calls but rest assured that those things are happening.

In fact, Candice and I have a weekly call (and usually lots of text messages) to touch base and keep each other informed.

I hope that you found something interesting in this post. I welcome your questions and comments. My email is jlsjenna.boitano@gmail.com.

I look forward to seeing you at a JLS event soon!

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Leadership Retreat
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BAM Kids Fair

 

What the Junior League of Seattle Means to Me

By Shanna Lisberg

 Shanna shift photoWhen I lived in Washington DC, sometimes I would walk into Georgetown and I would always see this beautiful 3-story brick building. There was a plaque on the building that read “Junior League of Washington” and it always intrigued me. I didn’t know what the Junior League was but, after some research, I discovered it was a women’s organization devoted to training and volunteering. I always wanted to join but unfortunately never had the opportunity.  

 When I moved to Seattle in 2011, I had pretty much forgotten about the Junior League; I was busy trying to find a job, trying to meet people, and trying to settle in to my new city. It wasn’t until a couple of years later that a friend mentioned the Junior League and I thought it would be a great time to join. I enjoy volunteering and I thought it would be a wonderful way to get out in the community and meet people.

I wasn’t sure what to expect when I joined the League. I knew there would be volunteering, I knew there would be meetings, and I knew there would be fundraising.

But the Junior League is so much more.

It’s more than just a group of women in a room talking about their causes. It’s more than just a monthly meeting where service awards are handed out. It’s about advocating and going out into the community to support and help the population. It’s about book clubs and socials, and learning how to become effective leaders. It’s about friendships and knowing that the person sitting next to you cares about the same things that you do.

 The Junior League has afforded me so many opportunities to contribute to my community. I’ve spent my Saturday morning packing bulk food at a food bank, tagged and sorted clothes at the Treehouse Wearhouse store, gotten dirty while gardening, helped set up Christmas parties at Mary’s Place and the annual Harborview Children’s Holiday Party. I’ve mingled with lawmakers and learned about causes important to the Junior League while touring the capitol during Capitol Days. I’ve watched documentaries, engaged in thought-provoking conversations, and listened to panels regarding our foster care system. I’ve gone to trainings to learn about starting a business. And that’s just in the past few years.

 Additionally, I’ve met so many amazing ladies in the League. The Junior League is a wonderful assortment of countless, diverse women who all choose to make a difference. There are women from all walks of life, in all areas of professions, all giving their time to volunteer and fundraise for the same cause.

 Not only am I able to build lasting friendships, but by volunteering in the community, the League allows me to connect so much more to the place where I live. I enjoy giving back to a community who has embraced me so fully and knowing that I’m able to give back to those less fortunate makes my time spent with the League that much more gratifying.

 I’m proud to be a member of the Junior League of Seattle.

Annual Campaign

A gift to the Annual Campaign is a financial affirmation of the JLS mission of promoting volunteerism, developing the potential of women, and impacting the community. A gift demonstrates a belief in the ability of the League to use the money as necessary to meet our goals as specified by the current strategic plan.

The Annual Campaign is a vital component of the financial health of the JLS. Unlike other funds, a donation to the Annual Campaign (unless directed otherwise) is used, as the organization deems necessary towards the overall stability of the League. Some years, funding may be put towards starting a new committee; other years, money may be used to cover general operating costs or facility rental to secure locations large enough to accommodate our growing membership.

JLS is first and foremost a leadership training organization. This year, we are going back to our mission and focusing on training our members to be not only be capable volunteers, but also how to be a Leader in the League, in their professional life and in the community.

One of the training programs JLS offers is the Pathway to Boards.

The Pathway to Boards Certificate gives our members the tools, skills and resources needed to become effective board members in our community. Members who have completed the certificate will discover not only the basics, such as Robert’s Rules of Order and how to interpret financial statements, but also the differences between nonprofit and public boards, roles and responsibilities of board members (including fundraising), the structure and evolution of nonprofits, and how to find a good fit.

Corey Orvold is following this training path. Corey said, “When I heard about the Pathway to the Board Certificate, I knew it was a great opportunity to take my volunteering to the next level. So far the training sessions offered and the opportunity to sit in on various board meetings has really helped me understand how to efficiently participate in board meetings. I look forward to obtaining the certificate and being able to join a non-profit board in the near future.”

Dani Carson is half way through her requirements for this certification. Dani told us she chose this training for “the opportunity to learn more about different types of boards, and what is involved in being a board member of a nonprofit: the roles and responsibilities, fundraising expectations, participation, etc. and knowing which questions to ask, if you are interviewed for a position. It can be discouraging trying to get onto a board if you don’t have a specific skill needed, like an attorney or accountant. I wanted to know what other types of members boards look for, and how I can match my personality and personal mission to find the right fit for me.”

By donating to the Annual Campaign, you allow us to offer our members powerful training opportunities that not only help them grow as a person, but help the community as well!

An Evening of Art and Conversation: Three Perspectives

Last month, a few dozen Junior League of Seattle members, along with several guests, congregated at the Woodside / Braseth Gallery for an evening of art and conversation focused on northwest art and artists.  John Braseth, the owner, warmly welcomed visitors and led a tour of the beautiful space.   Jessica, Meredith and Katharine, JLS members, left this event feeling inspired and eager to share their thoughts about art.

Art1

Jessica

I would consider myself to be someone who appreciates fine art, but most certainly not an expert or collector. As we walked through the current Jared Rue exhibit, and stopped to learn about the other Northwest artists also on display, John touched upon a topic that had recently crossed my mind: how does one begin an art collection?

I have been fortunate enough to see renowned pieces in museums, galleries, and even private homes. However, the idea of purchasing a piece of “real” art–meaning, a bigger investment than custom framing on a print that I bought from a One Kings Lane sale–has always seemed a bit intimidating. Original artwork can be very expensive, and what do I know about investing in art, anyway? However, John emphasized that collecting can really begin anywhere–and that a personal attachment to the artist’s work is the most important element. Building a collection goes beyond whether or not something matches your home decor. It’s about the emotional ties that a buyer feels about the piece, and patronage of an artist can start small. While this all seems pretty obvious as I type it out, I realized that I’d attributed too much importance to the notion that art collecting needs to be done in a certain way–which inherently made starting a collection seem daunting and prohibitively expensive. While I didn’t walk out of the Woodside / Braseth Gallery with a painting in hand, the evening inspired me to further explore the amazing art of the Pacific Northwest–and made me hopeful about eventually bring an original piece into my home.

Meredith

For me, Northwest Art is the heart of the Junior League of Seattle.  Perhaps, it’s because the Northwest Art committee was my first placement with the League.  But I don’t think that is the only reason.  I’ve witnessed how a quiet, shy classroom of 6th graders can come alive while discussing a piece of art.  I’ve walked around a classroom and listened to students debate “what the artist really meant.”  As docents, the Northwest Art volunteers prompt the students with questions similar to the following: Art2

  • What do you see?
  • What does it make you think about?
  • How do you feel when you look at the artwork?
  • What do you think the artist was feeling when (s) he made this piece?

Ultimately, the docents are encouraging the classroom to explore and discover the art and the artist.  Very rarely, will students state that they love or hate the art work.  They manage to be open- minded and very honest about what they see.  Part of me wonders if their open mindedness is because they aren’t thinking about the art as something they would or wouldn’t own.  They are just seeing it and appreciating the art for exactly what it is: Art.

Spending the evening with NW Art at the Woodside/Braseth Gallery was lovely.  And listening to John Braseth talk about the history of the gallery and his experience with art, art patrons, and artists, was fascinating.  But I couldn’t help but miss the excitement of the classroom.  Maybe we are all ladies now, and a bit too refined to shoot up our hands or shout out what the paintings make us feel.  Maybe we are scared that we’ll get it wrong.  What if I don’t like the painting but the person next to me loves it?  Or we worry about buying the perfect piece of art.  I’m realizing that we, as adults, are missing out on what the Northwest Art docents are encouraging classrooms to do:  Explore and discover the art and the artist.  Very rarely will you walk into a gallery or museum where someone will prompt you with questions about the art.  We need to train ourselves to ask the questions and really see the art.  We need to be curious and explorative and seek out the art of discovery.  Love the piece or don’t love the piece, but still appreciate the art.

Katharine

As someone who has grown up as a daughter of an artist and has been experiencing life through art for 30+ years, I am always fascinated by learning how other people’s lives have been changed by art. I majored in Art History in college but left school feeling that “art” had a different meaning to everyone. We can analyze a piece to death and know all about the time in which it was created and what the artist was thinking, but none of that really matters if you hate the piece or feel nothing when you see it. Art3

What I appreciated most about the NW Art Training at the Woodside/Braseth Gallery was listening to the owner, John, speak about one piece in particular that made him realize how art can create a physical reaction. This is Morris Graves’ “The Wounded Gull” created in 1943.

Graves created the painting during WW2 to communicate the darkness of war. John said that he first saw “The Wounded Gull” as a very young man, and it was the first time in his life that he realized art didn’t have to be pretty in order to make you feel something. He commented that it is not necessarily the type of piece that everyone wants to have in their living room, but it is something that makes you think or even better, it is something that makes you feel.

I think that many people see art as a way to decorate. That is a completely natural response. But when you first experience having an emotional or visceral reaction to a piece of art, you are forever changed and never look at art the same way. I am so thankful to have been able to see a little bit of what the NW Art program is all about. Spreading the appreciation of original creative works to people who would not normally get to experience it, is a huge task and one that massively impacts a community of growing minds.

John’s call to action is what I left with in my mind. Do not be afraid to look at all types of art. Ask yourself if you have a reaction to a piece. And then, support an artist. An art collection can start with a $25 screen print that you purchased from an artist at a First Thursday art walk. It doesn’t have to be the price of a car. Just get out and experience art.

A cornerstone of Junior League of Seattle is the many diverse training opportunities for its members.  The NW Art Evening of Conversation is just one unique example.  The League also offers trainings in everything from legislative advocacy, to running effective business meetings, to living a balanced life.  If you are interested in joining the Junior League of Seattle, please read more on the JLS website about the upcoming Meet & Greets for prospective members.

From Place to Place

by Shanna Lisberg

The Advocacy Committee hosted a screening of the documentary “From Place to Place” followed by a panel discussion on March 18th. Every year, 30,000 youths age out of foster care, having spent an average of 5 years in the system. “From Place to Place” follows 3 of these teens – Micah, Mandy, and Raif – who have recently aged out of foster care and who are forced to face life with little support. Eventually, Mandy and Raif set out to change the system that raised them and travel to Washington D.C. to tell their stories on Capitol Hill and try to better the system for the generations to come.

“From Place to Place” was an incredibly moving film that highlights the struggles faced by foster youth in general, as well as when they age out of the system. Kids who age out of the foster system are at an extreme disadvantage to the rest of society. By age 21, of those who age out of foster care, 1 in 7 will experience homelessness, 50% will be unemployed, 71% of women become pregnant, and 77% of men will have been arrested.

Mandy wants to go to college but first she has to obtain her GED. Foster children have significantly higher rates of absenteeism at school than their peers, and a foster child loses four to six months of academic progress with each school change. It is estimated that only 3% of foster children who have aged out of the system will obtain a college degree.

Raif lives on the street where he beatboxes for money. He frequently travels the rails when he feels the need for adventure. Many foster children do not have access to important socialization opportunities such as sports and clubs, and access to money for basic needs such as clothing, shoes, and school supplies is limited.  

Micah is focused on trying to stay out of jail so he can help his girlfriend, who is pregnant. 20% of males who age out of the system will become career criminals as opposed to 5% of the general population. Research shows that many children in foster care struggle with mental health challenges arising from the trauma they’ve suffered, as well as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Currently, the United States spends 8 billion dollars a year on foster care and there are 420,000 kids in America’s foster care system. Children enter foster care through no fault of their own and for different factors such as neglect, poverty, and abuse. Foster care is designed to be a temporary living situation however, as we saw in the film, many kids do not leave the system until they are required to, at age 18.

After the film, Fredrick Kingston and Mandy Urwiler from The Mockingbird Society led a panel discussion regarding foster care and how we can help. Some of the topics discussed included an emphasis on kin-care and the Extended Foster Care program.

Kinship care is an alternative to foster care, whereby children who have been removed from homes are placed with relatives. The number of children living with a grandparent or other relation has increased considerably in the past years. Kinship care can benefit foster children as it provides increased stability and safety, as well as the ability to maintain family connections and cultural traditions.

The Extended Foster Care program provides an opportunity for teens in foster care to continue to receive support after they turn 18. In order to receive the services, teens must complete a secondary academic or vocational program, or participate in a program or activity designed to promote employment. Studies show that youth that are enrolled in an extended foster care program have higher college attendance, fewer arrests, and are less reliant on public assistance.

Children in foster care has been a long time advocacy focus for the Junior League of Seattle. Here’s how you can help make a difference:

  • Become a foster parent. There are currently over 10,000 children in Washington in need of foster homes
  • Become a Court Appointed Special Advocate and be a voice for young children in court
  • Become a mentor to any young person, including children in foster care
  • Donate time or services for kids in foster care
  • Donate clothing or other essentials to foster organizations
  • Volunteer at a foster organization
  • Write letters to or call your elected officials

You can find out more about “From Place to Place” at  http://fromplacetoplacemovie.com/

For more information about The Mockingbird Society, visit www.mockingbirdsociety.org

 

 

 

 

“FROM PLACE TO PLACE” SCREENING AND TRAINING

The Advocacy Committee will host a screening of the documentary “From Place to Place” followed by a panel discussion on March 18th at Hotel 1000. The film “tells the story of the invisible children who grow up in America’s foster care system”.  Children in Foster Care has been an advocacy focus for the League. Understand how you can make a difference in lives of foster youth; broaden your awareness of how children come into foster care and what the effects can be; look for ways you can advocate, use your voice and make a difference.  Please plan to stay for the panel guests to ask questions and get REAL answers.

Find out more about the movie here: http://fromplacetoplacemovie.com/ .

Copies of the movie will also be available for purchase with all net proceeds going to JLS.

A pre-show meet up will start at 5:30 pm at BOKA Restaurant + Bar in Hotel 1000, followed by a cash bar on the second floor gathering area from 6:30 pm to 7:00 pm. The screening is free and participants will receive a training credit.

**** We are opening this event up to non-League members, so please invite your friends! Please be sure to enter the total number of people in your group next to ‘Quantity’ when you register- space is limited! ****

Location: Hotel 1000 – Front Room (1000 1st Ave, Seattle, WA 98104)

Valet Parking will be $12 for League Members for this event

RSVP

Screening: https://www.jrleagueseattle.org/?nd=m_event_detail&key=4858

Happy Hour: https://www.jrleagueseattle.org/?nd=m_event_detail&key=4860

Day-Long Training Focuses on Advocacy, Fundraising

By Shanna Lisberg

Close to 100 first-year members of The Junior League descended upon the Mercer Island Presbyterian Church on Saturday, Jan. 25, for an all-day training. The day started out early and, as members gathered to check in, more than one lady arrived bearing a large cup of coffee. By 9 a.m. the training was under way and members had broken out into their first training sessions of the day.

Members attended four training sessions – two in the morning and two sessions in the afternoon. By attending and completing the all-day training, provisional members were able to satisfy their League training requirement for the year.

Provisionals had the option to choose from six training topics:

  • Advocacy 101

  • Parliamentary Procedures

  • How to Run Effective Meetings

  • Fundraising – How to Make the Ask

  • Your Junior League Career Path

  • How to be an Effective Volunteer

The Advocacy Committee’s Chair and Vice-Chair presented Advocacy 101. We learned that advocacy boils down to picking an issue and talking about it, and that one of the best ways to get involved is to know your legislators and to call or write them a letter. Additionally, advocacy can be for all sorts of issues, not just political issues.

Parliamentary Procedures discussed the purposes and rules of parliamentary procedure and the steps of going through motions and discussions. Topics included how to make a motion, when to table a motion, and tips for debating and voting on motions.

Issues discussed in the How to Run Effective Meetings training included the different types of meetings and how to be a facilitator of a meeting. Some of the tips for running a successful meeting included: Stick to the agenda, make sure there is a clear reason for the meeting, and always end a meeting on a good note.

Fundraising – How to Make the Ask discussed how to reach out and make the first step in asking for donations and contributions. We learned that it’s important to identify the key players and to know what you want to procure. Most significantly, anyone can make the ask, you just have to advocate for what you love.

There are many different career paths within the Junior League. Your Junior League Career Path aimed to explain how members can advance in the Junior League. We learned that the main key is to know your interests and to recognize what position(s) you want to attain.

Tara, the volunteer coordinator for Mary’s Place, spoke about How to be an Effective Volunteer. Some of the tips given by Tara included learning about the background of the organization you want to volunteer with, figure out what the staff expects from its volunteers, and have a commitment to how you want to help.

The all-day training was a terrific experience and a great opportunity to interact with other provisional members. All the presenters were engaging and incredibly knowledgeable in their area. At the end of the day, we all learned something new and hopefully we can implement these skills in our future roles in the Junior League.

Leadership Retreat – Mandatory

ALL INCOMING 2012-2013 JLS LEADERS

MANDATORY ATTENDANCE

Saturday, June 2nd, 2012
8:30am-2:30pm
Amazon Van Vorst Building
South Lake Union
RSVP online

While we are winding down a successful year for the Junior League of Seattle, we are also preparing for the new one! We are holding a mandatory training for all Leaders this coming Saturday, June 2.  Leadership training will cover the items and tools that will help all Leaders be successful. Training includes:

  • Clear messaging about our 2012-2013 goals to assist your leadership planning.
  • Breakout toolkit session to help new leaders manage their projects efficiently.
  • Hands on breakout training with our Digital Cheetah Representative, Colleen Geisler.
  • Lunch meetings by Wing to discuss strategic initiatives for the year.
  • Carol Scott, AJLI Consultant & Fundraiser extraordinaire, speaking on a variety of topics.

Any questions, please contact JLS Training:

Kellea Williams – kellea@amazon.com
Sarah Rose – sarahrose206@gmail.com
& Michelle Haines – michellejhaines@gmail.com.

Leadership Training – June 2nd – Mandatory

JLS Leadership Training
Saturday, June 2nd, 2012 from 8am – 2:30pm
Amazon Van Vorst Building, South Lake Union
Click here to RSVP – Please RSVP via the website so we can plan your lunch preference, breakout sessions, seating and costs appropriately.

Leadership Training is mandatory for all incoming members of leadership for 2012 – 2013.

Training Includes:

  • Clear messaging around 2012-2013 goals to incorporate into your leadership planning.
  • Breakout toolkit session for new leaders to help manage them efficiently.
  • Hands on breakout training with our Digital Cheetah Representative, Colleen Geisler.
  • Wing lunch meetings to discuss Strategic Wing Initiatives for the year.
  • Carol Scott, AJLI Consultant & Fundraiser extraordinaire, speaking on a variety of topics.

Any questions, please contact JLS Training: Kellea Williams – kellea@amazon.com, Sarah Rose – sarahrose206@gmail.com or Michelle Haines – michellejhaines@gmail.com.

Training – All Training info – JLS, AJLI, and online.

LAST TWO TRAININGS OF THE 2011 – 2012 JLS YEAR

Don’t forget your two training requirements! Light food and drinks are provided and you are sure to learn something new with the fantastic speakers we have lined up! Please RSVP if you can attend one of these great sessions.

April 30th – Women in Finance Advanced

May 8th – Taking it to the Next Level: Advanced Social Media Techniques  – Currently FULL. Please keep checking the website or add yourself to the waiting list if you’d like to attend this event.

TRAINING ONLINE – FIRST MODULE NOW AVAILABLE TO VIEW

Our first self-paced training module, Building Leaders and Blazing Trails: Changing the World with The Junior League, is now online and available to you at your convenience. This is a great way to have a better understanding of our powerful Association.

WEBINAR WEDNESDAYS

Learn how local women are impacting our community. Check out AJLI’s Webinar Wednesdays to hear from two amazing Junior League of Seattle sustainers, Colleen Willoughby and Dee Dickinson. Both of these inspiring women have been recognized for their commitment to service by being awarded the Dorothy Stimson Bullitt Award as well as being honored by AJLI as Mary Harriman Award winners. You can view both trainings on demand.

Don’t miss out on these opportunities to be inspired!

Other upcoming Webinar topics include:

April 18: “To Lead Is to Serve, How to Attract Volunteers and Keep Them,” featuring: Shar McBee, author.

May 2: “Uncharitable: How Restraints on Nonprofits Undermine Their Potential,” featuring: Dan Pallotta, author

Webinars begin at 1:00 p.m. ET. Be sure to register in advance for the webinars of your choosing. You can also view past webinars on demand.

To receive credit for online trainings, print out the certificate of completion and provide a copy to your Active or Provisional Advisor. Or, you may send your certificate of completion directly to Kellea Williams at kellea@amazon.com. For Webinar Wednesday attendance and another training credit, please let your Advisor know which session you attended. We will be able to confirm via the online attendance records. You can take as many courses as you’d like, but you will only receive training credits for one of each. Please contact Kellea Williams, kellea@amazon.com  with any questions.

To access the online training and Webinar Wednesday’s, log-in to the AJLI website, go to the Training & Meetings tab, and choose Online Learning.  If you haven’t set up your AJLI account, you’ll need your AJLI Member # which can be found in your online profile or by contacting administrator@jrleagueseattle.org.