Category: Events

High Stakes Fun with Boardwalk Empire Game Night

Boardwalk Empire Game NightBelieve it or not we are less than four weeks away from the 2015 JLS Boardwalk Empire: Game Night!  Come support the Junior League’s commitment to its mission — including community initiatives and volunteer training efforts — at one of the most popular fundraising events on the JLS calendar.  Get dressed in your Jersey shore or Atlantic City best and be part of hotsy-totsy high stakes fun: test your architectural skills with a game of life-sized Jenga, perfect your toss with a round of cornhole, and try your luck with other boardwalk-style games.   The evening will also feature a DJ, live entertainers, silent auction, raffle and wine toss – everyone is sure to walk away a winner!  

Over $7K in prizes have already been secured for Boardwalk Empire Night including a $400 gift card to Skoah, Sounders tickets, $300 in products and services from Ann Fisher Hair, EMP tickets, and great items from Matthews Winery, Desert Sun Tanning, Starbucks, Ethan Stowell restaurants, Pepper Bridge/Amavi Winery and more.  Whoop it up and don’t miss your chance to win some awesome prizes!  Join the Facebook event page for updates on prizes, entertainment and more.  


Who: You!  And all of your friends and family (League members or not).  Anyone 21+ looking for a fun way to spend a Friday night and support the JLS.

What: JLS Game Night: Boardwalk Empire

When: Friday, April 10, 2015 – 7:00pm – 10:00pm.  

Where: 415 Westlake – 415 Westlake Avenue North, Seattle, WA 98109

Tickets:  $35 advance purchase on the JLS website – Includes complimentary beverage, hors d’eouvres, and a ticket to the best game night in Seattle! Tickets will be sold at the door for $50 on an as-available basis.

An Evening of Art and Conversation: Three Perspectives

Last month, a few dozen Junior League of Seattle members, along with several guests, congregated at the Woodside / Braseth Gallery for an evening of art and conversation focused on northwest art and artists.  John Braseth, the owner, warmly welcomed visitors and led a tour of the beautiful space.   Jessica, Meredith and Katharine, JLS members, left this event feeling inspired and eager to share their thoughts about art.

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Jessica

I would consider myself to be someone who appreciates fine art, but most certainly not an expert or collector. As we walked through the current Jared Rue exhibit, and stopped to learn about the other Northwest artists also on display, John touched upon a topic that had recently crossed my mind: how does one begin an art collection?

I have been fortunate enough to see renowned pieces in museums, galleries, and even private homes. However, the idea of purchasing a piece of “real” art–meaning, a bigger investment than custom framing on a print that I bought from a One Kings Lane sale–has always seemed a bit intimidating. Original artwork can be very expensive, and what do I know about investing in art, anyway? However, John emphasized that collecting can really begin anywhere–and that a personal attachment to the artist’s work is the most important element. Building a collection goes beyond whether or not something matches your home decor. It’s about the emotional ties that a buyer feels about the piece, and patronage of an artist can start small. While this all seems pretty obvious as I type it out, I realized that I’d attributed too much importance to the notion that art collecting needs to be done in a certain way–which inherently made starting a collection seem daunting and prohibitively expensive. While I didn’t walk out of the Woodside / Braseth Gallery with a painting in hand, the evening inspired me to further explore the amazing art of the Pacific Northwest–and made me hopeful about eventually bring an original piece into my home.

Meredith

For me, Northwest Art is the heart of the Junior League of Seattle.  Perhaps, it’s because the Northwest Art committee was my first placement with the League.  But I don’t think that is the only reason.  I’ve witnessed how a quiet, shy classroom of 6th graders can come alive while discussing a piece of art.  I’ve walked around a classroom and listened to students debate “what the artist really meant.”  As docents, the Northwest Art volunteers prompt the students with questions similar to the following: Art2

  • What do you see?
  • What does it make you think about?
  • How do you feel when you look at the artwork?
  • What do you think the artist was feeling when (s) he made this piece?

Ultimately, the docents are encouraging the classroom to explore and discover the art and the artist.  Very rarely, will students state that they love or hate the art work.  They manage to be open- minded and very honest about what they see.  Part of me wonders if their open mindedness is because they aren’t thinking about the art as something they would or wouldn’t own.  They are just seeing it and appreciating the art for exactly what it is: Art.

Spending the evening with NW Art at the Woodside/Braseth Gallery was lovely.  And listening to John Braseth talk about the history of the gallery and his experience with art, art patrons, and artists, was fascinating.  But I couldn’t help but miss the excitement of the classroom.  Maybe we are all ladies now, and a bit too refined to shoot up our hands or shout out what the paintings make us feel.  Maybe we are scared that we’ll get it wrong.  What if I don’t like the painting but the person next to me loves it?  Or we worry about buying the perfect piece of art.  I’m realizing that we, as adults, are missing out on what the Northwest Art docents are encouraging classrooms to do:  Explore and discover the art and the artist.  Very rarely will you walk into a gallery or museum where someone will prompt you with questions about the art.  We need to train ourselves to ask the questions and really see the art.  We need to be curious and explorative and seek out the art of discovery.  Love the piece or don’t love the piece, but still appreciate the art.

Katharine

As someone who has grown up as a daughter of an artist and has been experiencing life through art for 30+ years, I am always fascinated by learning how other people’s lives have been changed by art. I majored in Art History in college but left school feeling that “art” had a different meaning to everyone. We can analyze a piece to death and know all about the time in which it was created and what the artist was thinking, but none of that really matters if you hate the piece or feel nothing when you see it. Art3

What I appreciated most about the NW Art Training at the Woodside/Braseth Gallery was listening to the owner, John, speak about one piece in particular that made him realize how art can create a physical reaction. This is Morris Graves’ “The Wounded Gull” created in 1943.

Graves created the painting during WW2 to communicate the darkness of war. John said that he first saw “The Wounded Gull” as a very young man, and it was the first time in his life that he realized art didn’t have to be pretty in order to make you feel something. He commented that it is not necessarily the type of piece that everyone wants to have in their living room, but it is something that makes you think or even better, it is something that makes you feel.

I think that many people see art as a way to decorate. That is a completely natural response. But when you first experience having an emotional or visceral reaction to a piece of art, you are forever changed and never look at art the same way. I am so thankful to have been able to see a little bit of what the NW Art program is all about. Spreading the appreciation of original creative works to people who would not normally get to experience it, is a huge task and one that massively impacts a community of growing minds.

John’s call to action is what I left with in my mind. Do not be afraid to look at all types of art. Ask yourself if you have a reaction to a piece. And then, support an artist. An art collection can start with a $25 screen print that you purchased from an artist at a First Thursday art walk. It doesn’t have to be the price of a car. Just get out and experience art.

A cornerstone of Junior League of Seattle is the many diverse training opportunities for its members.  The NW Art Evening of Conversation is just one unique example.  The League also offers trainings in everything from legislative advocacy, to running effective business meetings, to living a balanced life.  If you are interested in joining the Junior League of Seattle, please read more on the JLS website about the upcoming Meet & Greets for prospective members.

November 13th is Ladies Night!

Believe it or not we are less than two weeks away from the 2014 JLS Bachelor Auction!  Come help support the Junior League’s commitment to its mission — including community initiatives and volunteer training efforts — at one of the most popular fundraising events on the JLS calendar. Whether you are looking for a bachelor yourself or helping a friend find her soul mate, there is nothing to lose at this event. Not only will lucky winners walk away with a great man, but these guys also come with date packages.

Details:

Who: You! And all of your friends (League members or not), mothers, grandmothers, single friends and taken friends, brothers, cousins, you get the point.  Anyone 21+ looking for a fun way to spend a Thursday night and support the JLS.

What: The 4th Annual JLS Bachelor Auction

Where: 415 Westlake – 415 Westlake Avenue N., in South Lake Union

When: Thursday November 13th – Doors open at 6:00pm for VIP, 6:30pm for general admission

Why: Cute single guys? Date packages? Drinks? One of Seattle’s most popular emcees? Check, check, check and check! The real question is, why not?

Tickets: Available here.

  • $55 VIP – Includes complimentary beverage, hors d’oeuvres, early admission at 6:00pm, front row seating and more surprises to come!
  • $40 General Admission – Includes complimentary beverage, hors d’oeuvres, and a ticket to the best bachelor auction in Seattle!

Below is a sneak peak at just some of the bachelors that will be up for bid.  Follow our event on Facebook for the complete view of our bachelors, info on date packages and more about the event.

Mike, 31 – Originally from southern California, this bachelor comes with an MBA, a penchant for running and a killer smile.B1

John, 32 – No adjustments are needed to this chiropractor bachelor!  He’s a former collegiate athlete, a true to the blue Mariner fan and is close with his family.B2

Duncan, 25 – Bazinga!  This math and physics whiz works in investment banking, plays beach volleyball when the weather allows and loves dogs.B3

Marc, 45 – Relatively new to Seattle, this 6′ 5″ bachelor works in sales, is a Boston College alum and enjoys jazz.B4

Downtown Seattle Rocks the Runway

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By: Shanna Lisberg

The Third Annual Downtown Seattle Rocks the Runway fashion show will be held on Saturday, September 20th at the Paramount Theatre. This year’s event at the Paramount brings fashion into the theater arena, as ticket holders will receive an up close view of more than 80 of the latest fashion looks for fall featured by Seattle retailers. Multiple ticket levels include a VIP experience featuring an exclusive pre-show VIP lounge, front-row runway seating, swag bags and a late-night Downtown post-party.

Downtown Seattle Rocks the Runway is a fun and fashionable way to support local businesses, as well as the Junior League of Seattle. As the charitable sponsor, all net proceeds from ticket sales help fund JLS and its programs to promote voluntarism, develop the potential of women, and impact the community through the effective active of trained volunteers.

The evening begins at 6:30 p.m. with a walk on the red carpet. A cocktail and hors d’oeuvres reception begins at 7:00 p.m. in the main theatre before the fashion show struts its stuff at 8pm. Seattle Met Style Editor Laura Cassidy and KIRO TV Traffic Reporter Alexis Smith will host the runway show.

I had the opportunity to get a sneak peek into Downtown Seattle Rocks the Runway and to view a preview of some of the upcoming fall fashion trends last week at the Blogger Preview Party at the Hotel Vintage. Laura Cassidy was on hand to share her inspirations for fall fashion, and local fashion bloggers Alix Rose and Thig Nat captivated the room with their personal thoughts on blogging, style, and the Seattle scene.

Some of the upcoming fall trends, as identified by Laura Cassidy were:

New Color Theories – There are no rules about color anymore, but rather color is this thing that can be mixed.

Outwear as Outfit – This trend can be identified by coats with great shapes, coats with great prints, and statement outwear. We all know that Seattle has been rocking this trend for years.

Street Sport – This trend stems from the idea that many designers take their cues from what people wear on the streets. It is about being comfortable and feeling at home and can be seen in a dress up sweat that has thought and purpose or as sneakers worn with an evening vibe.

Sweater Dressing – Not just sweaters will be worn as dresses, but sweaters will be worn as skirts and pants as well. Be on the lookout for knit skirts and knit blazers.

Long Layers – This trend is envisioned by plenty of tunic shapes and skirts over pants, as well as long coats and duster coats worn with dresses over pants and tunics over dresses.

Accessories – Chokers and one earring looks will be making a return. Embellished and jeweled socks are a fun way to add color to your look.

Additionally, Gary Manuel and Aveda shared some of the latest hair and make-up trends for fall. Hair will be messy and full, with plenty of texture. Exaggerated hair is making a comeback, so grab those crimpers out of the back of your cabinets and start crimping!

Join us for all the excitement! Come celebrate fall fashion and help support the Junior League of Seattle while getting an up close view of some of Seattle’s finest autumn clothing and accessories. Click here to buy your ticket and be sure to use the #SEArunway tag on Twitter and Instagram. We’ll see you on the runway!

Let’s Get Ready to Build!

by Shanna Lisberg

Dust off your hard hats and pick up your paint brushes.  Done-In-A-Day needs your participation in two upcoming events. No construction knowledge required, just your can-do attitude.

  • REBUILDING TOGETHER SEATTLE on April 26

On Saturday, April 26th, the Junior League of Seattle will once again be participating in Rebuilding Together Seattle (formally Christmas in April). Each year JLS works side by side with Rebuilding Together Seattle to renovate homes for low income homeowners, particularly those who are elderly or disabled and would not otherwise be able to afford the needed renovations to their home.

Our event is part of the National Rebuilding Together Day, where volunteers from around the nation come together to rehabilitate the homes of more than 2,000 low-income homeowners. Held on the last Saturday in April, National Rebuilding Together Day is the day when partners plan projects to celebrate the organization’s mission and to bring national attention to the plight of America’s low-income homeowners.This year, nearly 1000 volunteers will repair 25 homes around Seattle. As a volunteer on National Rebuilding Together Day, your efforts will have a national impact by providing a safer, healthier, and happier environment for these homeowners.

JLS will be working in the Shoreline area on a group home for four adults with disabilities. Morning and afternoon shifts are available on Digital Cheetah. If you cannot join us and would like to contribute to our efforts, gift cards to Home Depot are much appreciated.

For more information, please contact Erin Danner at erin_danner@hotmail.com.

  • HABITAT FOR HUMANITY on May 10

On Saturday, May 10th, the Junior League of Seattle will participate in the Women’s Only Build, sponsored by Habit for Humanity. At the January General Meeting, many ladies were interested in Habitat for Humanity.  We are fortunate in that they have granted us 14 spots on their Women’s Only Build.

The Women’s Only Build seeks to empower women to take action against poverty housing conditions. The program brings together women from all walks of life to address the housing crisis facing millions of women and children worldwide.

Our project is in Rainier Vista, from 8:30-4:30 pm. A full 8 hours earns you two shift credits! This is a great opportunity to learn new skills and catch up on those service shifts. Sign-ups are available on Digital Cheetah. Please note: the shift is for the entire day and we are unable to break the shift into two separate shifts.

For more information, please contact Amy Bingell at abingell@aol.com

  • Don’t forget to keep an eye out on the calendar. This fall, JLS will have its own Habitat for Humanity Build!

We look forward to seeing all the JLS volunteers out in the community, showing off their carpentry skills and swinging their hammers! Remember, no experience is necessary!

League & Community Outreach: Northwest Art’s Spring Kids’ Art Studio

by Liz Nixon

It was another rainy Saturday in Seattle, however 15 kids and their parents were having a blast at the Junior League office in Madison Park at the Kids’ Spring Art Studio on March 29, 2014.  The Northwest Art League & Community Outreach committee hosted the event.

The kids, ranging in ages from 3 to 10-years-old, were introduced to several fun pieces from the League’s extensive art collection, including a painting by Dale Chihuly and a lithograph by Mark Tobey. Trained League members acted as docents and discussed the art with the children using an inquiry-based approach. Next, the older children headed downstairs to experiment with print-making using linoleum tiles.  Younger children walked through several activities upstairs, including printing using etched Styrofoam, and monoprints with everyday objects.  Kids left with mounted art in hand, although a few left their pieces in the office for our future kids’ art “gallery!”

KidsStudio_Mar29_10am_Alexis_Grace_Lauren

The bi-yearly Kids’ Art Studio is just one way that the Northwest Art committee reaches League members and our surrounding community. More than 20,000 kids in King County are exposed to the original Northwest art in the League’s collection via curriculum workshops in Seattle Public Schools and docent training for the Bellevue School District.  Northwest Art partnerships allow the committee to host exciting events at the Bellevue Art Museum, Seattle Affordable Art Fair, Mirabella, and the Henry Art Gallery.

 

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Whether targeted toward kids or adults, the Northwest Art League & Outreach committee encourages members to check out our next event!

 

 

 

 

Learn more @ http://www.jrleagueseattle.org/?nd=community_nwa

 

From Place to Place

by Shanna Lisberg

The Advocacy Committee hosted a screening of the documentary “From Place to Place” followed by a panel discussion on March 18th. Every year, 30,000 youths age out of foster care, having spent an average of 5 years in the system. “From Place to Place” follows 3 of these teens – Micah, Mandy, and Raif – who have recently aged out of foster care and who are forced to face life with little support. Eventually, Mandy and Raif set out to change the system that raised them and travel to Washington D.C. to tell their stories on Capitol Hill and try to better the system for the generations to come.

“From Place to Place” was an incredibly moving film that highlights the struggles faced by foster youth in general, as well as when they age out of the system. Kids who age out of the foster system are at an extreme disadvantage to the rest of society. By age 21, of those who age out of foster care, 1 in 7 will experience homelessness, 50% will be unemployed, 71% of women become pregnant, and 77% of men will have been arrested.

Mandy wants to go to college but first she has to obtain her GED. Foster children have significantly higher rates of absenteeism at school than their peers, and a foster child loses four to six months of academic progress with each school change. It is estimated that only 3% of foster children who have aged out of the system will obtain a college degree.

Raif lives on the street where he beatboxes for money. He frequently travels the rails when he feels the need for adventure. Many foster children do not have access to important socialization opportunities such as sports and clubs, and access to money for basic needs such as clothing, shoes, and school supplies is limited.  

Micah is focused on trying to stay out of jail so he can help his girlfriend, who is pregnant. 20% of males who age out of the system will become career criminals as opposed to 5% of the general population. Research shows that many children in foster care struggle with mental health challenges arising from the trauma they’ve suffered, as well as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Currently, the United States spends 8 billion dollars a year on foster care and there are 420,000 kids in America’s foster care system. Children enter foster care through no fault of their own and for different factors such as neglect, poverty, and abuse. Foster care is designed to be a temporary living situation however, as we saw in the film, many kids do not leave the system until they are required to, at age 18.

After the film, Fredrick Kingston and Mandy Urwiler from The Mockingbird Society led a panel discussion regarding foster care and how we can help. Some of the topics discussed included an emphasis on kin-care and the Extended Foster Care program.

Kinship care is an alternative to foster care, whereby children who have been removed from homes are placed with relatives. The number of children living with a grandparent or other relation has increased considerably in the past years. Kinship care can benefit foster children as it provides increased stability and safety, as well as the ability to maintain family connections and cultural traditions.

The Extended Foster Care program provides an opportunity for teens in foster care to continue to receive support after they turn 18. In order to receive the services, teens must complete a secondary academic or vocational program, or participate in a program or activity designed to promote employment. Studies show that youth that are enrolled in an extended foster care program have higher college attendance, fewer arrests, and are less reliant on public assistance.

Children in foster care has been a long time advocacy focus for the Junior League of Seattle. Here’s how you can help make a difference:

  • Become a foster parent. There are currently over 10,000 children in Washington in need of foster homes
  • Become a Court Appointed Special Advocate and be a voice for young children in court
  • Become a mentor to any young person, including children in foster care
  • Donate time or services for kids in foster care
  • Donate clothing or other essentials to foster organizations
  • Volunteer at a foster organization
  • Write letters to or call your elected officials

You can find out more about “From Place to Place” at  http://fromplacetoplacemovie.com/

For more information about The Mockingbird Society, visit www.mockingbirdsociety.org

 

 

 

 

Impact Day Is Almost Here!

by Shanna Lisberg

Join the Junior League of Seattle on Saturday, April 5, 2014 by making an impact on the community and promoting volunteerism! Approximately 100 trained volunteers will be providing direct service at over 10 volunteer events across the greater Seattle area, offering much-needed volunteer resources to improve the health, education and welfare of women and children. Volunteers will be participating in a wide variety of projects to serve the following community organizations: YWCA, Boys & Girls Club, Solid Ground, Mary’s Place, Youthcare, Lifewire, Northwest Harvest and Food Lifeline.

Formed in 1923, the Junior League of Seattle (JLS) was founded on the idea that the greatest way to make a positive impact on the community is to empower and train female leaders while promoting voluntarism. Over the decades, JLS has made an unprecedented contribution to the welfare of women and children in the Puget Sound area by developing projects that are still making a difference today.

JLS Volunteers at Seattle Tilth's Demonstration Garden.
JLS Volunteers at Seattle Tilth’s Demonstration Garden.

90 Shifts for 90 Years

This year, the Junior League of Seattle celebrates its 90th anniversary as the premier women’s organization in the Puget Sound area. In honor of our anniversary, JLS is committed to completing 90 service shifts to make an enormous impact in the community. 90 Shifts for 90 Years is a memorable way to commemorate our dedication and enthusiasm for community service. Throughout the year, JLS members have been volunteering their time and skills in a wide variety of service shifts. We are close to our goal of 90 shifts and need everyone’s help and support for our Big Day of Service!

League members are invited to save the date and sign up for a volunteer shift. This is a great occasion for committees and provisional groups to join a shift together to celebrate the year’s work. Additionally, this is one of the last opportunities to obtain service shift credit for member obligations.

Shifts are visible on the JLS website and will be located in multiple locations throughout the greater Seattle area. You are welcome to bring friends and family to volunteer, and again, our goal is to have as many volunteers out in the community at the same time. Help JLS reach our goal of 90 service shifts for 90 years, with at least 100 volunteers, and give back to our community.

We need your help to make April 5 the best Impact Day yet!

New Timeline Chronicles 90 Years of JLS History

by Christina Trabant

How do you pack 90 years worth of Junior League of Seattle history into a timeline?  How do you illustrate the changes our League has experienced during those 90 years?  How do you digitally save the information while also creating a physical and movable representation that League members can view and enjoy?  That was the task set before my Provisional Project group, as we took on the JLS Visual History Timeline Project.

The project was conceived by League staff member Courtney Laguio, who spent much of the past two years organizing and cataloguing the archives in the office.  With the blessing of JLS President Rebecca Wilson, Laguio’s brainchild for a Provisional Project was green lit for the 2013-2014 year in advance of the anniversary celebrations.

During our group’s first meeting in September, we discussed a number of ideas for the timeline itself and a reveal party.  We wanted to highlight the important dates as well as the projects and issues the League championed.  We held work parties to pour over the archived photographs and read through the Annual Reports and Greenbooks.  Of course any Junior League of Seattle timeline would be remiss without mentions of the Seattle Day Nursery, Braille Library for the Blind, The Wise Penny Thrift Shop, Puget Soundings, the Cookbooks and Northwest Art as well as our two Mary Harriman award winners, Dee Dickinson and Colleen Willoughby.

During our work parties, the group remarked about learning the smaller details the archives allowed us to uncover.  For example: The amount of money the Wise Penny brought in during its inaugural year; the membership number flux over the past 90 years, particularly during World War II; the year that League members began being recognized by their own names instead of their married names; the evolution of the Madison Park office purchase and opening; and the first year the President-Elect position started.  We also enjoyed viewing the varying member fashion over the years and seeing skinny jeans featured during a 1970s fashion show.  As a Provisional, I was especially interested in the 1976-77 year, when the League began scheduling Provisional gatherings in the evenings to accommodate an increasing number of working women and the 1985-86 year, when Provisional Projects were added.

After gleaning the dates and data we wanted to include, Courtney Laguio used her graphic design skills to create the layout of eight distinct poster drafts.  Each poster represents one decade, from the 1920s through the 1990s.  We chose not to build a poster for the 2000s decade, as we are hoping League members will view the timeline and come forward with more archival information.  Our group members had the opportunity to review and comment on the drafts via the GroupShare function on Digital Cheetah and the final posters were printed.

The timeline reveal party took place during the January edition of Bubbles & Bites, Monday, January 27th at the League office. In addition to showing off the final product of our Provisional Project, the party featured recipes made as part of a service shift from the League cookbooks.  Even if you missed it, keep your eyes peeled at our upcoming 90th Anniversary Celebration on Saturday, April 5th, where the timeline is scheduled to be on display.

To purchase tickets to the 90th Anniversary Celebration, please click the following link. Friends and family are invited!

https://www.jrleagueseattle.org/nd=90th_anniversary

 

Junior League Takes the Capitol

by Olivia Burley

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The JLS Ladies with Senator Joe Fain

On Monday, February 17 – aptly Presidents’ Day, the Junior League of Seattle hosted Capitol Day at the State Capitol in Olympia. Joined by members of the Junior League chapters in Olympia, Tacoma, and Yakima, the event focused on providing an overview of the state legislative process, meeting key players, and learning how we can get involved – as legislators and as advocates of the causes that are important to us.

The JLS Capitol Day Committee organized a jam-packed day for attendees. We kicked off with breakfast and then met with Noah Ullman, Executive Assistant to Senator Joe Fain, who explained how the State legislative process works. It was a busy day on the floors of the House and Senate as bills were being presented.

Senator Joe Fain met with us amid the hustle and bustle in the gallery wings. Fain represents the 47th Legislative District (Auburn, Kent, Covington, and Renton) and is the Senate majority floor leader. He urged JLS members to bring our community activism to Olympia by running for office and shared with us the behind the scenes narrative that colors the legislative process.

From there, we moved to the Senate gallery and observed the action on the floor before taking a tour of the Capitol. Our guide shared the interesting history of the Capitol and Washington State and made each of us feel like a distinguished visitor.

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Following our tour, we met in Governor Jay Inslee’s conference room with Kelly Ogilvie, Senior Policy Advisor to the Governor. Ogilvie gave an overview of some of the issues most important on the Governor’s agenda:  education, increasing the minimum wage, and creating jobs. Then, he opened the floor to a discussion with Junior League members. Arts funding, education, and access to nutritional food were some of the topics touched on in the conversation.

Representative Cyrus Habib represents the 48th Legislative District (Redmond, Kirkland, Bellevue, Clyde Hill, Hunts Point, Yarrow Point, and Medina) and met with our group over lunch. He answered questions moderated by JLS member McKinley Smith. Habib shared his focus on issues that affect women in Washington State, namely pay equity and reproductive rights, and answered questions.

McKinley Smith and Representative Cyrus Habib
McKinley Smith and Representative Cyrus Habib

Following the formal agenda of our day, Capitol Day attendees were given time to visit their district representatives. While most were busy on the floor or in meetings when we stopped by, their staff welcomed us and encouraged follow-up conversations.

Capitol Day was a wonderful introduction to the State legislative process. Everyone we met was delighted to have community interest and engagement and encouraged the women of the Junior League to make their voices heard.