Month: August 2014

Ten with Megan Isenhower, 2014-2015 President

The Junior League of Seattle’s membership includes 1,200 women who are passionate about becoming leaders and skilled volunteers while creating a powerful impact in our Seattle community.

Through numerous trainings and significant volunteer work, members form close connections with one another.  However, with an organization this large, there is always another JLS member to meet. This year on the JLS Blog, the “Ten with … ” series will highlight Provisionals, Actives and Sustainers.

The women of the Junior League of Seattle have diverse backgrounds, careers and interests. Through this series, we hope to provide a glimpse into the women of the Junior League of Seattle. We kick of the series with our 2014-2015 President, Megan Isenhower.

Megan Isenhower, 2014-2015 President1. When did you join the League?
My provisional year was 2003-2004.

2. What was your provisional project?
My provisional project was planning a pre-camp celebration for Camp Goodtimes, a camp run by the American Cancer Society for kids battling cancer and their siblings.

3. What was one of your personal highlights from the 2013-2014 League year?
2013-2014 was a big year for me. Personally, I got married and had a baby, and personally within the League, the highlight of my year was the passing of the gavel at the Past Presidents’ Luncheon. There was a long line of phenomenal women next to me; there are some mighty impressive shoes to fill!

4. What most excites you about the 2014-2015 League year?
One of the most important aspects of my job, from my perspective, is offering support to committees or groups so that they can achieve their goals. I am excited – and hopeful – that I can lend support so that each group within the League feels that they can achieve what they set out to do. Sometimes a little guidance is needed; sometimes just a “check-in” to say, “hello” or “how can I help?” I also am excited about working on some long-term projects that I hope will benefit the League in the next decade.

5. What advice do you have for members hoping to form new connections or strengthen emerging friendships within the League?
I have several thoughts on this one:
– Introduce yourself to someone new at every League event and don’t sit with your friends only;
– Send thank you notes – I carry some in my purse along with stamps, and I have Junior League ones and personal ones at my office, too; and,
– Pick up the phone (I’m reminding myself!); emails are impersonal, someone can misread it, and the impact isn’t as great as that personal touch achieved by your voice saying “hello.”

6. Junior League of Seattle offers a multitude of diverse service shifts! What advice do you have for members trying to decide where to start?
Think about your year ahead and when you will have the most to do, whether it’s work, personal or League-related. If you know you have a really busy spring, I would try to get my service shifts done early. Think about what you like to do and check the JLS calendar on the website to see if anything is posted. Check back often as service shifts will be posted at various times. Sign up as soon as you can! Be sure that you cancel your RSVP if you cannot be at a shift – as far out as possible – so others can sign up.

7. What is your favorite recipe from the Junior League cookbook?
The Dijon Marinated Shrimp.

8. Which items tempt you most every year at the Premier Event?
Sports-related items and jewelry tempt me the most.

9. What is one passion or hobby you enjoy outside of the League?
GONZAGA BASKETBALL! Go ZAGS

10. Would you rather have the power to fly or be invisible?
With the traffic in Seattle, I would like to be able to fly so I can get places more quickly. However, taking traffic out of the picture, being invisible would be a lot of fun because I could be very mischievous. 🙂

Tips to Keep Kids Safe and Healthy This Summer

By Shanna Lisberg

Children’s health and wellness has always been a key issue for the Junior League. Programs such as Kids in the Kitchen seek to help reverse childhood obesity and its associated health issues. While living a healthy life involves healthy eating and staying physically fit, a healthy lifestyle should also involve being safe and making healthy lifestyle choices for yourself and your family.

This summer, children will be playing outside and basking in the sunshine, as the warm weather and longer days bring plenty of opportunity to enjoy the outdoors. Help keep your kids safe and healthy this summer with the following tips:

    1. Keep kids hydrated. Remind children to drink often throughout the day, especially if they are playing. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends drinking about every 20 minutes if kids are active in sports. About five ounces is fine for a kid weighing 88 pounds.
    2. Protect children’s skin from the sun. Everyone should apply a water-resistant sunscreen that protects against both UVA and UVB rays every day of the year. Sunscreen should be at least SPF 30 and should be applied 15 to 30 minutes before going outside
    3. Sunglasses are a must. Overexposure to UV rays can be especially harmful for the very young. The lens in a child’s eye cannot filter out as much sun as an adult lens. Some studies suggest that 80 percent of sun damage occurs before age 10.
    4. Inspect playground equipment before letting kids play on it. Before your kids play on the playground, be sure to check it out first. It’s important to make sure that nothing is broken or rusted. Also, keep an eye out for metal equipment and surfaces that can become hot in the sun and can cause burns.
    5. Make sure your children have proper footwear. While flip-flops can keep feet cool, they are not the most appropriate footwear when children are playing. Make sure your children’s feet are covered to protect them from injury.
    6. Follow pool safety. Never leave kids alone near the pool and always swim only in designated swimming areas when a lifeguard is on duty. Teach your children to swim. Air filled or foam toys, such as water wings, noodles, or inner tubes, should never be used in place of life jackets. These toys are not designed to keep swimmers safe.
    7. Bike Safely. Make sure your children know the rules of the road and appropriate hand signals for turning and stopping. Make sure your child always wears a helmet and that it fits properly. Check your child’s bike to make sure the brakes, tires, and reflectors are all working correctly.
    8. Travel with care. Teach your children to buckle up every time they get in the car, no matter how long the drive. If your children are young, make sure they are adequately secured in age- and size-appropriate car seats and booster seats.
    9. Beware of insects. Protect your kinds from insect and mosquito bites by using insect repellent. Choose a repellent with no more than 10% to 30% concentration of DEET. Be watchful when it comes to ticks and check your kids every day.

 

Remember, just because you are being safe, doesn’t mean you can’t have fun this summer!

*Material for this article from How Stuff Works, United Healthcare, the Massachusetts Office of the Child Advocate, and the National Traffic Highway Safety Administration.