Month: May 2012

Leadership Retreat – Mandatory

ALL INCOMING 2012-2013 JLS LEADERS

MANDATORY ATTENDANCE

Saturday, June 2nd, 2012
8:30am-2:30pm
Amazon Van Vorst Building
South Lake Union
RSVP online

While we are winding down a successful year for the Junior League of Seattle, we are also preparing for the new one! We are holding a mandatory training for all Leaders this coming Saturday, June 2.  Leadership training will cover the items and tools that will help all Leaders be successful. Training includes:

  • Clear messaging about our 2012-2013 goals to assist your leadership planning.
  • Breakout toolkit session to help new leaders manage their projects efficiently.
  • Hands on breakout training with our Digital Cheetah Representative, Colleen Geisler.
  • Lunch meetings by Wing to discuss strategic initiatives for the year.
  • Carol Scott, AJLI Consultant & Fundraiser extraordinaire, speaking on a variety of topics.

Any questions, please contact JLS Training:

Kellea Williams – kellea@amazon.com
Sarah Rose – sarahrose206@gmail.com
& Michelle Haines – michellejhaines@gmail.com.

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Letter from Renee

Dear Junior League of Seattle Members,

The 2011-12 Board of Directors has watched over an extraordinary year in the Junior League of Seattle.  From voting in a new organizational structure to seeing our newest community projects, Kids in the Kitchen and Lifeskills for Women flourish, to overhauling and improving our communication and social media efforts, to serving hundreds and in some cases, thousands of children with our projects and services, we have accomplished a great deal.  We have much to be proud of, not the least of which is the simple fact that voluntarism lives in our hearts and continues to be the foundation of our amazing organization.

Thank you to the 2011-12 Board of Directors.  I have trouble finding words that adequately express my admiration for your thoughtfulness, passion and stewardship.  To all the women who accepted leadership roles, whether chairing a committee, working as an advisor, I am so grateful.  To every Active, Sustainer and New Member who stopped me at an event, picked up the phone or sent an email with a new idea or words of advice, I thank you.

My one regret this year is that I have not had the opportunity to get to know each and everyone of you as well as I would have liked, the year did go by amazingly fast.  Yet on a very real level I do know you.

You are the women who lead and who gladly follow other leaders.  Voluntarism is vital to your lives.  You can be found fitting your personal life around your Junior League life.  You rejoice in the daily victories of the women and children who you serve.  You send emails in the wee hours of the morning.  You work like mad.  You challenge yourself to ask for the dollars that keep our community projects running.  You are positive forces in this community.  You are problem solvers. You are hand-holders.  You have families and friends that are very proud of you.

You are the women of the Junior League of Seattle and I have been so honored to lead you.

Ashley Baerwaldt takes the gavel and I am delighted to pass this on to an incredibly gifted and talented woman, someone I can also call a very dear friend.  Ashley is an outstanding leader and the League is in very good hands.

With my thanks, admiration, respect and love,

Renee

Make Your Favorite Recipes healthier – A Substitutions Guide

For many Junior League members, cooking has been a passion for years and hosting dinner parties has been an easy way to stay in touch with friends and to catch up over good food, wine and conversation.  It’s also a great way to relax at the end of a long day and to try fresh local ingredients.

So many amazing family recipes from our grandmothers and mothers are filled with yummy ingredients like butter, heavy cream, cheese, and did I mention butter? Although these recipes are delicious, when cooking for my friends and family, simple ingredient substitutions can help to make the meals just a little bit healthier without sacrificing the flavor or spirit of the dish.

There are a lot of great websites and resources to help us succeed at making these substitutions. The Mayo Clinic is a favorite resources. They have 5 quick tips on healthy substitutions, and an entire section of their site that focuses on Nutrition and Healthy Eating. Eat Better America is another site that has some great tips and tools and good education on overall health and nutrition.

If you don’t have a lot of time to do research on these sites – here are some key items from the Mayo Clinic that they recommend as substitutions you can make in your meals.

Your guide to ingredient substitutions for healthy recipes
If your recipe calls for this ingredient: Try substituting this ingredient:
Bacon Canadian bacon, turkey bacon, smoked turkey or lean prosciutto (Italian ham)
Bread, white Whole-grain bread
Bread crumbs, dry Rolled oats or crushed bran cereal
Butter, margarine, shortening or oil in baked goods Applesauce or prune puree for half of the called-for butter, shortening or oil; butter spreads or shortenings specially formulated for baking that don’t have trans fats

Note: To avoid dense, soggy or flat baked goods, don’t substitute oil for butter or shortening. Also don’t substitute diet, whipped or tub-style margarine for regular margarine.

Butter, margarine, shortening or oil to prevent sticking Cooking spray or nonstick pans
Cream Fat-free half-and-half, evaporated skim milk
Cream cheese, full fat Fat-free or low-fat cream cheese, Neufchatel, or low-fat cottage cheese pureed until smooth
Eggs Two egg whites or 1/4 cup egg substitute for each whole egg
Flour, all-purpose (plain) Whole-wheat flour for half of the called-for all-purpose flour in baked goods

Note: Whole-wheat pastry flour is less dense and works well in softer products like cakes and muffins.

Fruit canned in heavy syrup Fruit canned in its own juices or in water, or fresh fruit
Ground beef Extra-lean or lean ground beef, chicken or turkey breast (make sure no poultry skin has been added to the product)
Lettuce, iceberg Arugula, chicory, collard greens, dandelion greens, kale, mustard greens, spinach or watercress
Mayonnaise Reduced-calorie mayonnaise-type salad dressing or reduced-calorie, reduced-fat mayonnaise
Meat as the main ingredient Three times as many vegetables as the meat on pizzas or in casseroles, soups and stews
Milk, evaporated Evaporated skim milk
Milk, whole Reduced-fat or fat-free milk
Oil-based marinades Wine, balsamic vinegar, fruit juice or fat-free broth
Pasta, enriched (white) Whole-wheat pasta
Rice, white Brown rice, wild rice, bulgur or pearl barley
Salad dressing Fat-free or reduced-calorie dressing or flavored vinegars
Seasoning salt, such as garlic salt, celery salt or onion salt Herb-only seasonings, such as garlic powder, celery seed or onion flakes, or use finely chopped herbs or garlic, celery or onions
Soups, creamed Fat-free milk-based soups, mashed potato flakes, or pureed carrots, potatoes or tofu for thickening agents
Soups, sauces, dressings, crackers, or canned meat, fish or vegetables Low-sodium or reduced-sodium versions
Sour cream, full fat Fat-free or low-fat sour cream, plain fat-free or low-fat yogurt
Soy sauce Sweet-and-sour sauce, hot mustard sauce or low-sodium soy sauce
Sugar In most baked goods you can reduce the amount of sugar by one-half; intensify sweetness by adding vanilla, nutmeg or cinnamon
Syrup Pureed fruit, such as applesauce, or low-calorie, sugar-free syrup
Table salt Herbs, spices, citrus juices (lemon, lime, orange), rice vinegar, salt-free seasoning mixes or herb blends
Yogurt, fruit-flavored Plain yogurt with fresh fruit slices

 

 

Touch-A-Truck 2012

Touch-A-Truck
DATE: June 3rd, 2012
TIME: 10:00 am-1:00 pm
Magnuson Park -7400 Sandpoint Way NE, located off the 65th street entrance

OVERVIEW: The Junior League of Seattle presents Touch-A-Truck an event offering children a hands-on opportunity to explore heavy machinery and meet the people who build, protect and serve the Greater Seattle community. Vehicles on display may include construction trucks, utility vehicles, emergency responders, tractor-trailers, buses, and monster trucks. Children of all ages are allowed to creatively explore the trucks of all sizes with guidance from the respective professionals who explain the equipment and discuss the work they accomplish with such machinery. The event also includes activities such as food vendors, games, crafts, and other local vendors.

ATTENDANCE: The community-at-large is invited to attend.

COST: Free, but donations to the Junior League of Seattle are encouraged. If you are interested in being a part of Touch-A-Truck or interested in being a sponsor, please contact Kate King at katepking@gmail.com .

Also, if any JLS member has one of the following we could borrow for the event, please e-mail Bridget Laneuville at bridget.laneuville@gmail.com .

1) a popcorn machine
2) a cotton candy maker
3) small folding card tables
4) pop-up tents/ tailgate tents

Leadership Training – June 2nd – Mandatory

JLS Leadership Training
Saturday, June 2nd, 2012 from 8am – 2:30pm
Amazon Van Vorst Building, South Lake Union
Click here to RSVP – Please RSVP via the website so we can plan your lunch preference, breakout sessions, seating and costs appropriately.

Leadership Training is mandatory for all incoming members of leadership for 2012 – 2013.

Training Includes:

  • Clear messaging around 2012-2013 goals to incorporate into your leadership planning.
  • Breakout toolkit session for new leaders to help manage them efficiently.
  • Hands on breakout training with our Digital Cheetah Representative, Colleen Geisler.
  • Wing lunch meetings to discuss Strategic Wing Initiatives for the year.
  • Carol Scott, AJLI Consultant & Fundraiser extraordinaire, speaking on a variety of topics.

Any questions, please contact JLS Training: Kellea Williams – kellea@amazon.com, Sarah Rose – sarahrose206@gmail.com or Michelle Haines – michellejhaines@gmail.com.

May Celebration

Please join us on May 15th to celebrate the Junior League year as we highlight our accomplishments, recognize our Provisional, Active and Sustainer of the year as well as those members celebrating five and ten years of Active status in the League. We are also thrilled to honor and recognize our Dorothy Stimson Bullitt award recipient, Kathy Randall. Social begins at 6:30pm and our meeting will start promptly at 7:00pm.

Attention Provisionals and Sustainers! You are also invited to attend a champagne toast, hosted by our Sustainers from 5:30-6:30pm.

Lastly, this is your chance to get a photo taken or updated for next year’s Greenbook. The photographer will be available at 5:30pm to take pictures of Sustainers and Provisionals and Actives should arrive at 6pm to have their picture taken before the May Celebration meeting begins.

May Celebration
May 15, 6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: Seattle Golf Club, 210 NW 145th Street, Shoreline, WA 98177
Please note: no jeans allowed at the Seattle Golf Club.

RSVP by May 8th for the Sustainer/Provisional champagne toast.

RSVP on our website for May Celebration.

Blast from the Past – Lemon Fluff Pie

The Junior League of Seattle has recently re-released (due to popular demand) our Seattle Classic Cookbook. Originally printed in 1983, this cookbook is fun to peruse and sure to bring back fond memories of classic ‘80s dishes. Of course, no ‘80s cookbook would be complete with Jell-O, or in this case, gelatin.

Whether you’re interested in bringing back the ‘80s or looking to experience them for the first time, you’ve got to try this fantastic Lemon Fluff Pie. To make it you’ll need:

  • 1 tablespoon unflavored gelatin
  • 1 cup sugar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 4 eggs, separated
  • ½ cup lemon juice
  • 2/3 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon grated zest of lemon
  • ½ cup of heavy cream, whipped
  • 1 baked 9” pie crust
  • Heavy cream, whipped, and grated zest of lemon for garnish

In a saucepan, thoroughly mix gelatin, ½ cup sugar, and salt. Beat together egg yolks, lemon juice, and water and stir into gelatin mixture. Cook and stir over medium heat until just boiling. Remove from heat and stir in lemon zest. Chill mixture, stirring occasionally, until partially set.

Beat egg whites until soft peaks form. Add remaining sugar and beat again until stiff peaks form and sugar dissolves. Fold into gelatin mixture. Fold in whipped cream, pour into crust and chill. Just before serving, frost with a thin layer of whipped cream and sprinkle with lemon zest.

Serves 8. Bon appetit!

The JLS partners with Seattle Tilth

JLS members working at Seattle Tilth.

Done in a Day is a hard working committee that develops inspiring and motivating projects that enable the Junior League of Seattle membership to get directly involved with volunteer opportunities across the Puget Sound area. Seattle Tilth is an organization whose mission is to inspire and educate people to grow food organically, to conserve natural resources, and support local food systems in order to cultivate a healthy urban environment and community. Part of their curriculum involves educating children through providing a safe and fun place to learn how to tend a garden and take care of the environment through school groups, summer camps, and working together with their families. Due to the fact that the mission of Seattle Tilth and that of the Done in a Day (DIAD) committee are harmonious, the Junior League of Seattle has been pleased to partner with them to offer service shifts for our members in order to make a positive impact in our community.

A JLS service shift – gardening with Seattle Tilth.

During our first service shift with Seattle Tilth, Junior League of Seattle members visited their Good Shepherd Garden in Wallingford on a blustery fall afternoon. Members composted leaves, scattered mulch, harvested lavender, fortified worm habitats, and helped put the gardens “to bed for winter” at Seattle Tilth’s the adult learning center.  Members were invited to bring their children and were excited to be able to partake in a variety of activities. Since most attendees were true gardeners at heart, we were thrilled at the educational lecture on composting we received by an industry expert. As an added bonus, we were all invited to take home bouquets of fresh lavender!

Removing ivy from a 200ft fence with Seattle Tilth.

On the second service shift with Seattle Tilth, members chopped down English ivy, Himalayan blackberries, and English holly along a 200-foot long fence. It was important to get at the blackberries before the birds and animals ate them and spread them all around which would ultimately cause long term root damage to the surrounding vegetation on the wetlands. Cultivating the local wetlands is a project that the folks at Seattle Tilth are trying to grow for their various programs. The ivy, as we all know, can strangle a tree, and in some cases, left unattended over the years, cause its death.  It was a huge satisfaction to all when we could look down 200 feet of bare fence at the end of the day and understand our full accomplishment!  A few more of our members were given the opportunity to plant lettuce seedlings in one of the many greenhouses on site.

The remaining two service shifts for the year are pending, but one this is for sure, Seattle Tilth is an excellent partner, one that we have had a lot of fun working together with, and certainly one that we would like to see many more exciting projects with over the coming years.

Gardening for Seattle Tilth.

YWCA Easter Baskets

On the evening of April 2nd, a group of Junior League ladies showed up at Allie Okner’s house in Wallingford to create 50 spring baskets for kids living in shelters around the Seattle area. The YWCA, whose homeless shelters are a safe haven to families coming off the street or fleeing domestic violence, sponsored this event and delivered the baskets to the happy kids later that week. We know that these baskets (which were actually beach buckets that they can re-use) put smiles on many kids’ faces as they opened them up to find coloring books and pens, Rubik’s cubes, books, and candy!

After arriving at the shift, the ladies got straight to work, unpacking mountains of goodies, dividing them up into proper age groups, packing up the baskets, and wrapping them all up with ribbon. It was a casual and fun shift and gave the ladies time to chat with other JLS members, have a glass of wine, enjoy some sushi and, of course, do something positive for the Seattle community!

Here’s a note from the volunteer coordinator at the YWCA:

Dear Wonderful Donors,

Hop Hop Hop went the Easter Bunny all through the shelters, delivering over 550 baskets! You helped put smiles on kids’ faces here and there, no need to find anyone, as the kids came from all over to pick up their special Spring Basket!

The happiness you helped make happen not only makes a difference to the kids, the families, the case managers and staff, but also from all the volunteers and I that saw your generosity first hand, it was truly amazing and I thank you for it!

I hope your holidays were all as wonderful as you made theirs, and I wish you the best spring ever! Thank you all for your help and ongoing support; I have the best donors in the world!

Thanks! Nichelle Hilton YWCA

Thank you to all of our volunteers who participated!

YWCA Easter Baskets assembled by the JLS.

TEACH AND BE TAUGHT

Written by Alice G. Foreman, NW Art Committee Member:

Some might wonder at the title of this blog entry. For those currently serving on the Junior League of Seattle’s NW Art Committee, or JLS members who have served on the Committee and been privileged to go into one of the Seattle Public Schools (SPS), the meaning will be very clear. It won’t even be an “aha” moment; they will just smile and agree.

I want to provide a little explanation for those readers who have not enjoyed the experience of in-room teaching, being a docent, or being a member of the NW Art Committee (something I hope all Seattle Leaguer’s do at some point during their JLS career), but enough Committee endorsement, just read on and you will understand.

Before you can teach you must be taught. You must learn about art and our artists.  Being a member of the NW Art committee, you will learn under the watchful eyes of the Committee Chair, Vice Chairs and Committee Advisors. The keys and overarching links in the learning process of the NW Art Committee are two-fold:

  • Halinka Wodzicki, JLS’s art educator and the Museum Education Manager of the University of Washington’s Henry Art Gallery. The Henry is a fine repository of Northwest Art, a jewel of a show place for fine art as well as place to educate the public about art.
  • Committee continuity and knowledge sharing.

First of all, let us start with Halinka, a teaching star. She is knowledgeable and approachable.  She is the person who will give you the tools, knowledge and understanding of art you will need to be a successful docent yourself. Her lesson plans and insight tell you exactly how to use these tools and share them with students and teachers alike. So, if you choose to go into the schools to teach/docent, you will be taught.

Secondly, NW Art committee continuity and the sharing of knowledge and experiences is ever-present and an immeasurable factor in the success of bringing art into the schools.

When you get into the classroom, there are moments and experiences where your students teach you. They find a color you had not seen in an art piece. They see and share information about the placement of lines and shapes. You will find their excitement contagious. They will let you know what they see, and they are eager to try on your explanations and compare their thinking with yours.

The ultimate success is the knowledge that you have shared information that will help expand students’ horizons in all areas of their learning. It was always a great thrill for my docent partner, Minda Brusse, and I to receive a fine report card as well as appreciation from our school’s principal for the lessons we shared.

What did the students I taught and the experience of being a docent teach me? That a student’s eyes and minds are open to the creative wonder of art and its importance in our world, and that the experience of letting them interact with art and seeing their imaginations at work is a joy.