Extraordinary Junior League Members

22 Mar

By Shanna Lisberg

March is National Women’s History Month, a celebration of women’s contributions to history, culture and society. Over the years, the Association of Junior Leagues International has had many remarkable members – from First Ladies to authors, actresses, politicians and more. In honor of National Women’s History Month, here are six extraordinary women who have volunteered with the Junior League.

Shirley Temple Black
Known for her curls and dimples, Shirley Temple Black made her first appearance on the silver screen at the age of 4. In 1959 she joined the Junior League of Palo Alto. She would go on to head the Multiple Sclerosis Society, become a member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations General Assembly and serve as the U.S Ambassador to both Ghana and Czechoslovakia.

Nancy Reagan
Not only was Nancy Reagan a First Lady of the United States, a dazzling movie star in the 1950s, and the spokesperson for the “Just Say No” campaign, she was also a member of the Junior League of Los Angeles. She currently supports the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and advocates for embryonic stem cell research.

Julia Child
Before authoring Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Julia Child was a member of The Junior League of Pasadena, where she contributed to the League’s magazine. After joining the League in 1935, Julia Child would go on to become a member of the Office of Strategic Service, author numerous cookbooks and star in various television series.

Katharine Hepburn
Katharine Hepburn may have won four Academy Awards for Best Actress, but she was also a member of the Junior League of Hartford. She sought to challenge stereotypes about women and campaigned for women’s issues during her time with the League. An advocate for reproductive rights, she also spoke out against anti-Communism in Hollywood in the 1940s

Eleanor Roosevelt
The longest-serving First Lady of the United States, Eleanor Roosevelt was a member of the Junior League of the City of New York. After being introduced to the league by her friend, Junior League founder Mary Harriman, Eleanor Roosevelt worked with Junior League volunteers to improve living conditions for immigrants on the Lower East Side. Eleanor Roosevelt was a delegate to the United Nations and served on the UN Commission on Human Rights, where she oversaw the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Margaret Hamilton
You may know her best as the Wicked Witch of the West from The Wizard of Oz, but Margaret Hamilton was also a member of the Junior League of Cleveland. Trained as a teacher, Margaret Hamilton worked with children’s theatre programs and was an advocate of causes to benefit children and animals.

Visit the Junior League of Seattle’s website or The Association of Junior Leagues International, Inc. to learn more about these and many other amazing Junior League women.

High Stakes Fun with Boardwalk Empire Game Night

19 Mar

Boardwalk Empire Game NightBelieve it or not we are less than four weeks away from the 2015 JLS Boardwalk Empire: Game Night!  Come support the Junior League’s commitment to its mission — including community initiatives and volunteer training efforts — at one of the most popular fundraising events on the JLS calendar.  Get dressed in your Jersey shore or Atlantic City best and be part of hotsy-totsy high stakes fun: test your architectural skills with a game of life-sized Jenga, perfect your toss with a round of cornhole, and try your luck with other boardwalk-style games.   The evening will also feature a DJ, live entertainers, silent auction, raffle and wine toss – everyone is sure to walk away a winner!  

Over $7K in prizes have already been secured for Boardwalk Empire Night including a $400 gift card to Skoah, Sounders tickets, $300 in products and services from Ann Fisher Hair, EMP tickets, and great items from Matthews Winery, Desert Sun Tanning, Starbucks, Ethan Stowell restaurants, Pepper Bridge/Amavi Winery and more.  Whoop it up and don’t miss your chance to win some awesome prizes!  Join the Facebook event page for updates on prizes, entertainment and more.  


Who: You!  And all of your friends and family (League members or not).  Anyone 21+ looking for a fun way to spend a Friday night and support the JLS.

What: JLS Game Night: Boardwalk Empire

When: Friday, April 10, 2015 – 7:00pm – 10:00pm.  

Where: 415 Westlake – 415 Westlake Avenue North, Seattle, WA 98109

Tickets:  $35 advance purchase on the JLS website – Includes complimentary beverage, hors d’eouvres, and a ticket to the best game night in Seattle! Tickets will be sold at the door for $50 on an as-available basis.

An Evening of Art and Conversation: Three Perspectives

14 Mar

Last month, a few dozen Junior League of Seattle members, along with several guests, congregated at the Woodside / Braseth Gallery for an evening of art and conversation focused on northwest art and artists.  John Braseth, the owner, warmly welcomed visitors and led a tour of the beautiful space.   Jessica, Meredith and Katharine, JLS members, left this event feeling inspired and eager to share their thoughts about art.

Art1

Jessica

I would consider myself to be someone who appreciates fine art, but most certainly not an expert or collector. As we walked through the current Jared Rue exhibit, and stopped to learn about the other Northwest artists also on display, John touched upon a topic that had recently crossed my mind: how does one begin an art collection?

I have been fortunate enough to see renowned pieces in museums, galleries, and even private homes. However, the idea of purchasing a piece of “real” art–meaning, a bigger investment than custom framing on a print that I bought from a One Kings Lane sale–has always seemed a bit intimidating. Original artwork can be very expensive, and what do I know about investing in art, anyway? However, John emphasized that collecting can really begin anywhere–and that a personal attachment to the artist’s work is the most important element. Building a collection goes beyond whether or not something matches your home decor. It’s about the emotional ties that a buyer feels about the piece, and patronage of an artist can start small. While this all seems pretty obvious as I type it out, I realized that I’d attributed too much importance to the notion that art collecting needs to be done in a certain way–which inherently made starting a collection seem daunting and prohibitively expensive. While I didn’t walk out of the Woodside / Braseth Gallery with a painting in hand, the evening inspired me to further explore the amazing art of the Pacific Northwest–and made me hopeful about eventually bring an original piece into my home.

Meredith

For me, Northwest Art is the heart of the Junior League of Seattle.  Perhaps, it’s because the Northwest Art committee was my first placement with the League.  But I don’t think that is the only reason.  I’ve witnessed how a quiet, shy classroom of 6th graders can come alive while discussing a piece of art.  I’ve walked around a classroom and listened to students debate “what the artist really meant.”  As docents, the Northwest Art volunteers prompt the students with questions similar to the following: Art2

  • What do you see?
  • What does it make you think about?
  • How do you feel when you look at the artwork?
  • What do you think the artist was feeling when (s) he made this piece?

Ultimately, the docents are encouraging the classroom to explore and discover the art and the artist.  Very rarely, will students state that they love or hate the art work.  They manage to be open- minded and very honest about what they see.  Part of me wonders if their open mindedness is because they aren’t thinking about the art as something they would or wouldn’t own.  They are just seeing it and appreciating the art for exactly what it is: Art.

Spending the evening with NW Art at the Woodside/Braseth Gallery was lovely.  And listening to John Braseth talk about the history of the gallery and his experience with art, art patrons, and artists, was fascinating.  But I couldn’t help but miss the excitement of the classroom.  Maybe we are all ladies now, and a bit too refined to shoot up our hands or shout out what the paintings make us feel.  Maybe we are scared that we’ll get it wrong.  What if I don’t like the painting but the person next to me loves it?  Or we worry about buying the perfect piece of art.  I’m realizing that we, as adults, are missing out on what the Northwest Art docents are encouraging classrooms to do:  Explore and discover the art and the artist.  Very rarely will you walk into a gallery or museum where someone will prompt you with questions about the art.  We need to train ourselves to ask the questions and really see the art.  We need to be curious and explorative and seek out the art of discovery.  Love the piece or don’t love the piece, but still appreciate the art.

Katharine

As someone who has grown up as a daughter of an artist and has been experiencing life through art for 30+ years, I am always fascinated by learning how other people’s lives have been changed by art. I majored in Art History in college but left school feeling that “art” had a different meaning to everyone. We can analyze a piece to death and know all about the time in which it was created and what the artist was thinking, but none of that really matters if you hate the piece or feel nothing when you see it. Art3

What I appreciated most about the NW Art Training at the Woodside/Braseth Gallery was listening to the owner, John, speak about one piece in particular that made him realize how art can create a physical reaction. This is Morris Graves’ “The Wounded Gull” created in 1943.

Graves created the painting during WW2 to communicate the darkness of war. John said that he first saw “The Wounded Gull” as a very young man, and it was the first time in his life that he realized art didn’t have to be pretty in order to make you feel something. He commented that it is not necessarily the type of piece that everyone wants to have in their living room, but it is something that makes you think or even better, it is something that makes you feel.

I think that many people see art as a way to decorate. That is a completely natural response. But when you first experience having an emotional or visceral reaction to a piece of art, you are forever changed and never look at art the same way. I am so thankful to have been able to see a little bit of what the NW Art program is all about. Spreading the appreciation of original creative works to people who would not normally get to experience it, is a huge task and one that massively impacts a community of growing minds.

John’s call to action is what I left with in my mind. Do not be afraid to look at all types of art. Ask yourself if you have a reaction to a piece. And then, support an artist. An art collection can start with a $25 screen print that you purchased from an artist at a First Thursday art walk. It doesn’t have to be the price of a car. Just get out and experience art.

A cornerstone of Junior League of Seattle is the many diverse training opportunities for its members.  The NW Art Evening of Conversation is just one unique example.  The League also offers trainings in everything from legislative advocacy, to running effective business meetings, to living a balanced life.  If you are interested in joining the Junior League of Seattle, please read more on the JLS website about the upcoming Meet & Greets for prospective members.

One Night Count Reveals 3,772 Homeless, Outside in King County

23 Feb

By Marcy Comer

3,772 people were homeless and outside in King County on Jan. 23, according to results from the latest One Night Count – an annual survey organized by the Seattle/King County Coalition on Homelessness.  This number is an increase of 21% over those found without shelter last year. This number always is assumed to be an undercount – because officials do not count everywhere, and because many people take great care not to be visible. The reasons people are without shelter varies. Lack of affordable housing, poverty, unemployment, untreated mental illness or addiction, and domestic violence all contribute to homelessness.

“This year’s Count is heart-breaking evidence that we cannot cover our community’s most basic needs. Clearly, the crisis of people homeless and without shelter is growing, and clearly we must respond by using every resource we have. Everyone needs a safe place to rest,” said Alison Eisinger, Executive Director of the Seattle/King County Coalition on Homelessness.

The One Night Count has two parts:
1. A survey of emergency shelter and transitional housing providers about who is staying in their programs or facilities on that night. Staff from the King County Community Services Division, Homeless Housing Program coordinate the survey.
2. A street count of people who are homeless, without shelter and staying outside, in vehicles or in makeshift shelters. The Coalition has expanded the count from its downtown Seattle origins to include parts of over a dozen suburban cities and unincorporated King County and on Metro Night Owl buses.

How does the Count work?
Over 1,100 volunteers go out with 125+ trained team leaders to pre-arranged areas in parts of Seattle, East King County, North King County, Southwest King County, and South King County. The Count is only possible through the dedicated support from hundreds of individuals and dozens of community organizations, congregations and government agencies.
Since 2006, partial funding for the One Night Count has been provided by the King County Committee to End Homelessness, the coalition of government, business and nonprofits responsible for implementing our community’s Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness. The Count helps to inform progress on the Plan, as well as provide insight into the dynamics of homelessness and inform strategies for solving it.

Why perform the Count?
The One Night Count is carried out for two reasons: to document the nature and extent of homelessness in King County, and to build public engagement and action around the issue. It is a solemn and eye-opening opportunity to witness the survival struggles of our neighbors who are homeless. Hundreds of community members come together for this annual count, which acts as a powerful launching off point for participants to speak up and act and write and advocate to end this crisis.

Why does this matter to the Junior League of Seattle?
JLS is committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women and improving the community through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. Knowledge of our community’s homeless statistics is fundamental to affecting positive change to overall family stability in our community. To learn more about legislative solutions to make homelessness rare, brief, and one-time, visit Washington Low Income Housing Alliance (WLIHA)’s 2015 State Legislative Agenda and The Mockingbird Society’s 2015 State Legislative Agenda.

Homless Summary Graphic

Ten with a Provisional Member

17 Feb

The Junior League of Seattle is an organization of nearly 1,300 women who are committed to promoting voluntarism and to improving the community through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. Membership in the Junior League of Seattle is divided into 3 levels of membership status: Provisional, Active and Sustainer. Provisional status is reserved for members in their first year of membership, which is dedicated to training. Provisional status is followed by Active membership, then Sustainer status.

One of our current Provisional members, Taylor Coughlen, graciously volunteered her time to answer a few questions about why she joined the Junior League and what the Junior League means to her:

What provisional group are you in?

I am in the Panteleoni Provisional group! Most of our group lives in West Seattle: I am one of the outliers residing near Columbia City.

What is your provisional project?

I chose to go with Northwest Art. I have always been interested in learning about art and the motivations behind certain pieces.  I was lucky enough to take art classes all through elementary and junior high school and then to go on to Studio Art in high school. My art teachers were the most inspiring teachers I had growing up, and I can’t imagine missing out on that kind of instruction like some of the kids in this city do. I am excited to get started on the project this spring!

What prompted you to join the Junior League this year?  

I had looked in to different volunteer opportunities when I first moved to the area, but it seemed difficult to get an “in” just as an individual. When I looked into Junior League in Seattle it seemed like the organization provided a lot of structure and contacts within the community that would allow me to volunteer in a variety of roles. Also, as a recent college graduate and transplant from Texas, I missed the group of female friends I met as a member of a service sorority. I wanted to find a group of like-minded women in my new home, and the League seemed like a good place to start.

How did you first hear about the Junior League?

I first heard about Junior League growing up from my grandma when she used a life-changing sourdough bread recipe from the chapter cookbook in Wichita Falls, TX. I looked in to actually joining last year when one of my sorority sisters joined the League in Houston and raved about how much fun she was having.

What are you most excited about for the 2014-2015 year?

Becoming an active!

What most interests you about the Junior League?

I love that the Junior League has such a strong and important history nationally and in Seattle, especially in regards to service to women and children. It feels very cool to be a part of such a network of impressive women and to have the opportunity to continue service to this community that has been happening for over 90 years.

How long have you lived in Seattle?

I have been up here for a year and a half.

What is your favorite Seattle restaurant?

That’s a hard question in a city like Seattle. I love Intermezzo Carmine in Pioneer Square for a fancy date night with nice cocktails, but if I’m really hungry I go for the movie-themed sandwiches and the drink specials at HoneyHole in Capitol Hill.

What is your favorite touristy thing to do in Seattle?

I love going to the market, but especially so when the weather is really bad so that there isn’t such a crowd. I am always up for a Piroshky and tea samples from Market Spice!

What has surprised you the most about the Junior League?

It was surprising that there are so many women who are new to Seattle like I am. I expected JL to be full of native Seattleites.

 

Membership in the Junior League of Seattle is open to women ages 18 and older who express an interest in voluntarism. If you are interested in becoming a member, join us for a Meet & Greet this spring. Send an email to newmemberinfo@jrleagueseattle.org to find out the orientation schedule.

The Spirit of Giving

22 Dec

By Katharine Dunn Evans

G1The holiday season is quite possibly the most magical time of the year. Holiday parties, beautiful light displays, cozy evenings by the fire with family and friends and shopping for the perfect gift for everyone on your list. With all that, it is easy to get wrapped up in the excess of the holidays and forget what makes the season so special. It is a time to GIVE, and get joy from your generosity. It is a time to remember the people who are not as fortunate as you. And most importantly, it is a time to be with people, whether they are friends or family, and enjoy the moment.  G2

Volunteering is a wonderful way to give back, be with the people you care about and help those who are less fortunate. The Junior League of Seattle is a group of like-minded women who enjoy getting together to volunteer their time; this season in particular is a time for the ladies of the League to shine.

G3The holiday season should be a fun, festive and warm time. Sadly, there are many children in our area that don’t get the opportunity to create happy memories during the holidays. Circumstances could vary; perhaps they or a family member are sick, or their family can’t afford to buy gifts, or even worse they have no family at all. Earlier this month a group of Junior League of Seattle members got together to set up and work at the Harborview Holiday Party for Kids. The Healthy Futures Art Project committee organized a snowman snow-globe craft project that the attendees were able to create and customize. A little over 400 children from the area showed up and participated in the holiday fun! The kids loved the interactive art project and the ladies of the League had a blast helping and watching all the smiles and hearing the laughter.

G4

G6Another aspect of the holidays that we all love is the food. Even if we go overboard, food is something that brings us together and puts a smile on our faces. Not having enough to eat is a very big problem for a lot of families in our area. The Junior League regularly helps out at Food Lifeline, an organization that provides 82,000 meals a day to local food assistance programs with food that might otherwise go to waste. It is a fun way to get a group of people together to do something that really helps. Much of the work that gets done at Food Lifeline is through volunteer hours! A shift could be filled with sorting donations, uncrating and then re-packaging produce, cleaning, weighing, etc. This past week, a group of Junior League members got together to do just that, and had a blast doing it. G5

Volunteering doesn’t need to happen just during the holiday season; but doing it with a group of friends right now is such a great way to bring things in perspective when it’s so easy to lose sight of what is important. Not to mention, there is such a huge need. So gather up some pals and go help out an organization that is important to you. Helping those in need this year will only make your holidays all that more special.

G7

Hula Hooping Through an ENERGY Field Day

6 Dec

By Sara Muckler

Last month, I had the privilege of participating in Field Day with the Junior League of Seattle ENERGY Committee at the North Seattle Boys and Girls Club. The goal of ENERGY committee is to educate and help children (and their parents) to improve ENERGY 1their health and wellness. The children’s smiles and laughter at this event were certainly the highlight. They are a reminder that the long days at work or challenges we all face can melt with the smiling face of a child.

The event was truly an enjoyment. After speeding off from work, I walked into a packed gymnasium with lots of eager energy and fitness stations. We had over 36 Junior League members and 4 community volunteers. Numerous stations were set up including jump rope, corn hole, 4square, relays, hula hoops, power challenge, soccer, basketball, and decorating superhero masks. I was on hula hoops and despite the skills I may have had as a child, my hula hoop skills have gone downhill. The kids, however, were so creative in their approach and it was fun to give them the option of coming up with ideas as they taught me a few things!

Moving here from Florida, I am always looking to new activities for my kids to burn off inside during those rainy cold days. Field Day certainly gave me some great ideas for my own kids so I hope we were able to achieve the same goal for the kids at the North Seattle Boys and Girls Club. The staff at the club was amazing and you could see the warmth they have for the ENERGY 2kids that attend their program. It was truly heartwarming.

During my first year at Junior League I was part of the Junior League’s Kids in the Kitchen committee and learned quite a bit about food in the US and children’s access to healthy food. According to CDC studies, it’s suggested that some areas and households have easier access to fast food restaurants and convenience stores but limited access to supermarkets. Limited access to nutritious food and relatively easier access to less nutritious food may be linked to poor diets and, ultimately, to obesity and diet-related diseases. So it was fantastic to have the Kids in the Kitchen committee in attendance at Field day to give pointers and reminders about the amount of sugar in popular drinks.

It is such a great experience to be part of the Junior League and its days like Field Day that take you to a place of wanting to give and help as many children as you can. And so after a wonderful time of being with the children, I rushed out to pick up my two kids and taught them a few new hula hoop tricks of my own.

Giving Thanks on Thanksgiving

26 Nov

By Katharine Dunn Evans

In a few days, the US will be celebrating Thanksgiving. For some, it’s a day that is all about football, holiday shopping deals, food, food, food and … family, too. It is easy to get caught up in the many details of hosting Thanksgiving. You stress about when to defrost the turkey, the best pie crust recipes, who is sitting where at the table, and what your floral arrangements are going to be. In the midst of all that stress and/or excitement many of us forget why we do all of it.

Thanksgiving. The word itself should remind us what it means. Let’s give thanks. Let’s take a look at all the many blessings that we have even when things are hard. When you sit down to eat your Thanksgiving dinner this year, whether it is with family or friends, take a minute to think about what you have at that very moment, and be thankful for your family, support, stability and yes, food.

It is shocking how many families in our area simply do not have enough food to eat. Interestingly enough, 40% of good food goes to waste while 1 in 5 children in Washington state live in households that struggle to put food on the table. What’s worse is that a startling 1 in 6 people in our state seek the assistance of Food Stamps (a program that has suffered recent budget cuts).

Food Lifeline is an organization that creates creative ways to fight the hunger problem by “redirecting good food from manufacturers, farmers, grocery stores and restaurants that might otherwise go to waste.” They provide 82,000 meals a day to local food assistance programs.

The Junior League of Seattle is passionate about helping children in our area live happy, healthy lives, so it makes perfect sense that we work with Food Lifeline. It is fun and easy to help out in the cause to end hunger in Washington, and the ladies of the Junior League love to do it as part of the 9,000 people a year that give their time. One of Food Lifeline’s biggest needs is help with sorting the food before it gets distributed. If you are interested in helping visit https://foodlifeline.org/how-to-help or if you are a Junior League of Seattle member, check out the calendar for Food Lifeline service shift opportunities.

foodlifeline

So enjoy every morsel of delicious food and every moment you get to spend with the ones you love this Thanksgiving. Be present and aware of how lucky you are to have comfort, stability and love. Give thanks for what you have. Gobble, gobble!

Food Lifeline Video: http://youtu.be/4-G10aqGjck

Giving Tuesday December 2nd 2014

26 Nov

By Katharine Dunn Evans

givingtuesday

Black Friday, Cyber Monday … Giving Tuesday! Haven’t heard of it? I must admit, I hadn’t either. But now I have. We are inundated with holiday shopping deals during this time of year. Stores are opening their doors earlier to accommodate the crowds of shoppers. People are leaving their Thanksgiving celebrations to get in line for the best deals on electronics, cars, clothing … you name it.

I love to volunteer my time to organizations that mean something to me. I love it because my time gives back but also because I get something out of it. But sometimes, your schedule is so full that even if you want to give time, you can’t. Now, you can still give back! GivingTuesday.org says: “we have a day for giving thanks. We have two for getting deals. Now, we have #GivingTuesday, a global day dedicated to giving back.”

Tuesday, December 2, 2014 is an international day for charities, families, businesses, community centers, and students to join in celebrating generosity and giving back. It doesn’t necessarily have to be a financial contribution. You can give love, give encouragement at work, give a smile and a hello to a stranger on the street …

This is a great opportunity to think about what issues in your community or in the world are important to you. Can you give money to their cause? Can you share information about the cause with people you know? What is important to you?

It is okay if you haven’t thought much about it. You are not alone. And if you’d like to start learning about causes that might end up interesting you, we are happy to help! In addition to the Junior League of Seattle, here is a list of some great local organizations that are dear to our hearts and can always use help :

  • Junior League of Seattle: “An organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women and improving the community through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers.” www.jrleagueseattle.org
  • Mary’s Place: Empowering homeless women, children and families to reclaim their lives by providing shelter, nourishment, resources, healing and hope in a safe community.” www.marysplaceseattle.org
  • YWCA: “YWCA is dedicated to eliminating racism, empowering women and promoting peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all.” www.ywca.org
  • Boys & Girls Club: “To enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens.” www.bgca.org
  • Food Lifeline: “Working with the food industry and its surpluses, we come up with creative solutions to stopping hunger, including redirecting good food from manufacturers, farmers, grocery stores and restaurants that might otherwise go to waste.” www.foodlifeline.org
  • Treehouse: “We envision – and strive to create – a world where every child that has experienced a crisis of parenting has the opportunities and supports they need to pursue their dreams and become productive members of our community.” www.treehouseforkids.org
  • BikeWorks: Bike Works builds sustainable communities by educating youth and promoting bicycling. Since 1996 we’ve worked to educate and empower youth, and make bicycling accessible and affordable to the Seattle community.” www.bikeworks.org

In the Spotlight: Cascade Youth Symphony Orchestra

7 Nov

symphony

By Katharine Dunn Evans

There is no denying that it is harder to be a kid today than it was just 10 years ago. With funding being pulled for music and art programs in public schools, classes bigger than ever, bullying in social media, and violence on campus, it is a wonder that children are able to build some semblance of self-confidence and an interest in anything at all. Fortunately, it’s not all doom and gloom. People all around the nation see that there is a problem and have been working to create programs for kids in order to foster passion for the arts, music, education and sports.

A perfect example of this is with the Cascade Youth Symphony Orchestra. This fantastic organization creates a stimulating and age appropriate environment for musically talented children to build on their interest and develop their skills as musicians and performers. The participating children go through a year-long program that focuses on challenging and developing their potential in the art of performance. The goal is to “nurture their enjoyment of music as well as develop their musical skills and self-confidence.”

This group of kids works hard throughout the year with rehearsals, home practice, coaching sessions, retreats and concerts. Let’s put some emphasis on that last part: CONCERTS! These little artists love to perform and have actually played at several of the Junior League of Seattle events over the years. They generously donated their services and performed at our 90th anniversary celebration earlier this year and at several of our annual Premier Event galas. If you can get a chance to see them, you should take it.

There happens to be a very special performance coming up at Benaroya Hall that is one not to miss. They are playing excerpts from the Nutcracker along with the Olympic Ballet Theater. I cannot think of anything more precious and impressive. The details are below. This is the perfect way to start off the holiday season with your family and also support an amazing organization that is encouraging kids to build interests and grow to be true artists.

Excerpts from the Nutcracker with the Olympic Ballet Theatre
Concerto winner – Laura Sorensen, violin
November 15, 2014 2:00 p.m.
Benaroya Hall
Purchase tickets online through
www.Benaroyahall.org (browse calendar) or call 206.215.4747

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